FULL-TIME | WINNIPEG LOCATIONS NURBF-DG Nursing

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Overview

  • 32-month degree program (equivalent of four academic years) including a senior practicum of 450 hours
  • Each year of study is 10 months long and includes theory and clinical practice concurrently; a senior practicum follows the final 10-month year
  • Offered in three locations:
    • Notre Dame Campus, Winnipeg, MB
      • Due to high demand, this funded program is open to Manitoba residents only. Applications received from non-Manitoba residents for this program will be cancelled and the application fee will not be refunded. 
      • Annual application deadline of April 15
      • Three annual start dates in fall, winter, and spring, however only the fall intake will be advertised for application and all applicants will apply to the fall intake.
      • The College will determine which start date will be offered to successful applicants. 
    • Portage Campus, Portage la Prairie, MB and Winkler Campus, Winkler, MB
      • One start date every three years.
      • Next start date will be 2021. Application intake will open at a later date.
      • Seats are open to residents of Manitoba’s Southern Health Region only. Applications and supporting documentation received for these locations indicating a home address outside of the Southern Health Region will be cancelled and the application fee will not be refunded. 
      • Applicants will apply to their preferred location but will be subject to a competitive-entry process that includes all applicants for both locations. Offers of admittance will be made based on AGPA in descending order until all available seats at both locations are filled. Therefore, not all applicants will receive an offer for their preferred location. 
      • Students will be required to attend in Winnipeg approximately 2 to 3 days per term.
  • If you have a criminal record you may not be able to complete this program. If you are listed on a Child Abuse Registry or Adult Abuse Registry you will not be able to complete this program. See Admission Requirements for more info. 
  • All applicants must meet Admission Requirements within 30 days of applying. To prevent the cancellation of your application, do not apply until you are prepared to submit the required documentation within 30 days of applying. 
  • Learn about this program by reviewing the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) or ATTENDING AN INFORMATION SESSION. The session is approximately 60-90 minutes and will cover general program information, admission requirements, and how to apply. Sign up for a session that best fits your schedule.

Description
Following successful completion of the program, you will receive a Bachelor of Nursing (BN) degree from Red River College (RRC) and will be eligible to apply to write the NCLEX-RN® (National Council Licensure Examination - Registered Nurse). If you successfully complete this national exam, you will be eligible to apply to become a member of the College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba (CRNM) and legally use the designation Registered Nurse (RN).

Nursing program courses use a variety of learning methodologies including blended learning.

Prior to starting the program, you will be invited to attend a program overview information session.

Admission Requirements

If your academic history includes any of the following, please visit me.rrc.mb.ca/Catalogue/Information/MyEducation for important information: post-secondary studies at an institution other than Red River College; Modified (M), English as an Additional Language (E), or GED high school courses; or home schooling.

Submission of required documentation, including English language assessments, is due within 30 days of applying unless otherwise noted in your program's admission requirements.

If your program's admission requirements include any of the following items, note that the submission deadline for these items only has been temporarily extended to 90 days:

  • First aid course certificate
  • Physical fitness assessment results
  • Reading skills assessment results (Degree of Reading Power - DRP)
  • Student clinical practice and/or volunteer work experience forms

DOCUMENT SUBMISSION METHODS

Upload Through Your Future Student Account (preferred method)

  • Scan your document(s) and save the file. Maximum upload size is 5 MB.
  • Go to www.rrc.ca/apply and log in.
  • Click on your application, then Supplemental Items & Documents.
  • Find the applicable Supplemental Item - click on Browse.
  • Find the file you saved and double click on it.
  • Click on Upload. You can upload more than one document to the same Supplemental Item.
  • Status should read 'Received'.
  • Ensure you keep your original documents as the College may request to see them at any time.

If you do not have a Future Student Account or require assistance, please contact our Student Service Centre at 204-632-2327.

Mail or In-Person
Student Service Centre
Red River College
D101–2055 Notre Dame Ave.
Winnipeg, MB R3H 0J9
Hours of service

E-mail: register@rrc.ca

Fax: 204-697-0584

Internationally Educated Applicants - visit www.rrc.ca/credentials for credential assessment information.

Proof of completion of admission requirements is due within 30 days of applying unless otherwise noted in the program's admission requirements.

Annual application deadline: April 15

Before applying, it is important to review the Nursing program FAQs.

Your application will be cancelled without refund if you cannot submit proof of successful completion of the academic requirements within 30 days.

Submission of Transcripts
The College requires submission of transcripts verifying your complete academic history including any public or private high school, college, university, or technical institute you have attended. Non-submission of transcripts will result in cancellation of your application.

Academic Requirements (AR) Categories 
The College will determine which of the following AR categories you fall under:

  • Post-Secondary Applicant (PSA) - If you completed 24 or more credits of degree-level (1000 level or higher) post-secondary education your AR category will be the PSA category. 
  • High School Applicant (HSA) – If you completed less than 24 credits of degree-level (1000 level or higher) post-secondary education your AR category will be the HSA category.

The number of seats allocated to each AR category will vary from year to year, and will be based proportionally on the number of applications received for each category. For example, if the College receives 200 applications in a particular year:

  • If 150 of the applicants fall within the PSA category, 75% (150/200) of the seats will be offered to PSA applicants.
  • The remaining 50 applicants would fall within the HSA category resulting in 25% (50/200) of the seats will be offered to HSA applicants.

Post-Secondary Courses Graded Pass, Complete, Satisfied, or Standing
Course credits listed on post-secondary transcripts deemed to be degree-level (1000 level or higher) and graded as Pass, Complete, Satisfied, or Standing will:

  • Count towards the total number of credits completed
  • Be excluded from AGPA calculation

Adjusted Grade Point Average (AGPA) Calculation
Your AGPA will be calculated using the transcript(s) received by the College within 30 days of applying. Submission of future updated transcripts will not be considered.

The College will calculate your AGPA based on the following three factors:

  1. Your AR category
  2. Your grades
  3. A 4.5 GPA scale

AGPAs will be calculated to three decimal places and rounded to two decimal places.

A minimum AGPA of 2.5 is required regardless of the faculty/school of completion. However, an AGPA higher than 2.5 is recommended as admission is competitive.

Due to COVID-19, grades of pass, complete, satisfied and standing will be accepted to meet the Human Anatomy & Physiology requirement for the Spring 2020 and Summer 2020 terms only. To ensure fairness in AGPA calculation, we will calculate all applicants' AGPAs with and without their A & P grade. The higher AGPA will be used when determining admission eligibility.

Post-Secondary Applicant Category AGPA:

  • Will be weighted on post-secondary grades only and will include failed, repeated, forfeited, and excluded courses.
  • Courses graded Pass, Complete, Satisfied, Standing, or Voluntary Withdrawal will be excluded.
  • Post-secondary, dual credit, and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses as posted by the post-secondary institution deemed to be equivalent to degree-level (1000 level or higher) will be included in your AGPA calculation.

High School Applicant Category AGPA:

  • Will be weighted 60% Human Anatomy and Physiology course(s) grades, and 40% Grade 12 English 40S and Grade 12 Applied Math 40S or Pre-Calculus Math 40S grades.

Offers of Admittance
Offers of admittance will be made based on AGPA in descending order until all available seats in each AR category are filled. Therefore, not all applicants who meet admission requirements will be offered a seat. Applicants who meet admission requirements but do not receive an offer of admittance may reapply for a future academic year by submitting a new application and application fee.

Regular Admission Requirements

  1. Academic Requirements
    The College requires submission of transcripts verifying your complete academic history including any public or private high school, college, university, or technical institute you have attended. The College will determine which of the following two categories you fall under:
    • High School Applicant (HSA) Category
      • Submit proof of successful completion (graduation) of Grade 12, including one credit in each of the following courses:
        - Grade 12 English 40S
        - Grade 12 Applied Math 40S or Pre-Calculus Math 40S (other Math courses including Essentials Math is not accepted)
      • A minimum grade of 70% or 'B' is required in each of English and Math
      • University English (ENGL) and Math (MATH) 1000 level courses that are a minimum of 3 credit hours may also be accepted. Note: if you have completed 24 or more credits of degree level (1000 level or higher) post-secondary education your application will be processed under the Post-Secondary Applicant category.
      • If you are required to complete an English language assessment, do not submit your transcripts until requested to do so.  See Regular Admission Requirement 3 for more information.
        or
    • Post-Secondary Applicant (PSA) Category
      If you have completed 24 or more credits of degree-level (1000 level or higher) post-secondary education at the time of application you will be processed under the PSA category.
      • Submit proof of having successfully completed 24 or more credits of degree-level (1000 level or higher) post-secondary education. 
      • Normally, post-secondary transcripts must have been issued within 6 months prior to your application date, and submitted in a sealed envelope directly from the post-secondary institution.
      • If you are required to complete an English language assessment, do not submit your transcripts until requested to do so.  See Regular Admission Requirement 3 for more information.
        and
  2. Human Anatomy and Physiology (6-credits)
    • Submit proof of successful completion of 6-credits of acceptable Human Anatomy and Physiology (A & P) courses.
    • View a list of RRC's acceptable A & P courses
    • Courses must include a lab component.
    • A minimum grade of 65% or 'C+' is required in each course. However, grades of Pass, Complete or Satisfied will be accepted for courses completed in Winter 2020, Spring 2020 or Summer 2020 only.
    • You must have completed the course(s) within five years of the Nursing program start date being applied to. For the 2021/2022 academic year, all credits must have been completed on or after September 1, 2016. 
    • Post-secondary transcripts must have been issued within 6 months prior to your application date, and submitted in a sealed envelope directly from the post-secondary institution.
    • If you are required to complete an English language assessment, do not submit your transcripts until requested to do so.  See Regular Admission Requirement 3 for more information.
      and
  3. Reading Skills (DRP) or English Language Assessment (ELA)
    • Before applying, determine which assessment (DRP or ELA) is appropriate for your situation
    • We strongly advise you complete the assessment before submitting your application to ensure you meet required levels
    • Assessment results must be dated no more than two years prior to your application date
    • Have you successfully completed the equivalent of three years of full-time secondary (high school) education in Canada, the United States, or an ELR exempt country where English was the language of instruction?
  4. Applicant Declaration for Check Documents Form
  5. First Aid Course
    • Submit proof of current certification in the appropriate First Aid course.  To confirm which course you need to complete for this program click here

Program Progression Requirements
Program progression requirements are not due within 30 days of applying and should be submitted after you start classes.

  • Criminal Record and Adult and Child Abuse Checks
    • This program requires students to submit current original/official versions of one or more of the following checks:
      • Adult Criminal Record Check including Vulnerable Sector Search (ACRVS) 
      • Provincial Child Abuse Registry Check (CAR)
      • Adult Abuse Registry Check (AAR)
    • If you have a criminal record you may not be able to complete the program
    • If you are listed on an Abuse Registry you will not be able to complete the program
    • For details on this program's requirements, when to obtain and submit the documents, review the Applicant Declaration for Check Documents Form
    • These documents have expiration dates and should not be obtained prior to timeline indicated on the Applicant Declaration for Check Documents form
    • For general information on why RRC requires these checks and for links to check providers such as the Winnipeg Police, visit our Criminal Record Checks webpage
    • Submit your check documents to the RRC program contact listed on the Contact Information section of your program
      and
  • Immunizations and Testing

English Language Assessments

English Language AssessmentMinimum Required Levels
L - Listening, S - Speaking, R - Reading, W - WritingLSRW
CAEL and CAEL Online (Canadian Academic English Language)
70707070
CanTEST (Canadian Test of English for Scholars and Trainees)
RRC Institutional or Official CanTEST accepted EXCEPT for the Medical Laboratory Sciences (MLS) program. The MLS program requires the Official CanTEST (the RRC Institutional CanTEST will not be accepted).
4.54.54.54.5
Communication for Health Professions (RRC Pathway)
Canadian Citizens: LINC programs are not available.
8888
Communication for Internationally Educ Health Prof (RRC Pathway)
Canadian Citizens: LINC programs are not available.
8888
IELTS - Academic (International English Language Testing System)
7.07.07.07.0
TOEFL-iBT (Test of English as a Foreign Language - internet Based Test)
To meet the needs of students who are unable to take the TOEFL iBT® test at a test center due to public health concerns, ETS is temporarily offering the TOEFL iBT Special Home Edition test in selected areas.
24232427

Who Should Enrol?

Nursing is an art and science that focuses on providing health care to individuals, families, groups, and communities. Professional nurses must be able to act independently, responsibly, and with integrity. They must be skillful decision makers, communicators, and coordinators of care. As well, they must be able to speak and act assertively on behalf of their clients and their profession. Professional nurses view health holistically, and are a pivotal component of the modern health care system.

If you would describe yourself as a person who…

  • has both an analytical mind and a caring disposition
  • has mathematical and scientific ability
  • has physical stamina and dexterity
  • can communicate effectively with a variety of people
  • is comfortable working in multicultural settings
  • is organized and efficient
  • acts responsibly and with integrity
  • can think critically and independently
  • can make decisions based on evidence
  • can be assertive and advocate for others
  • is calm in stressful situations

... then professional nursing may be the career for you.

There are a number of fundamental skills and abilities that a nursing student must possess in order to engage in the types of activities in which nursing students will engage. This information can be used by prospective students in order to determine whether they are able to meet the demands of this career. The following list is an elaboration of the above characteristics, organized in five categories, with examples of entry-level registered nursing activities to illustrate the requisite. The examples are not exhaustive and offered only for the purpose of illustration. 

  1. Cognitive
    Ability to perform skills which demonstrate thinking capacity:
    - recall information over time
    - demonstrate complex computation skills
    - demonstrate critical inquiry skills
    - priorize tasks
    - demonstrate concentration skills
    - demonstrate problem-solving skills
    Example: In administering pain medication, critically analyzes assessment data, chooses from possible interventions, calculates correct dosage, safely administers medication, recognizes untoward effects and intervenes.
  2. Communication
    Ability to express and receive written, verbal or non-verbal information and the ability to interact with others in a clear, respectful and professional manner:
    - English language proficiency (reading, writing, listening, speaking)
    - recognizing own non-verbal communication and the ability to interpret non-verbal communication of others
    - ability to document and understand information, in writing as well as electronically, in the patient's chart/health record
    Example: Able to elicit and attend to information from a client during an assessment and communicate findings verbally and in writing to other health-care providers.
  3. Behavioral
    Ability to conduct oneself in a professional manner:
    - accept individual differences
    - take direction
    - behave in a professional manner
    - practice in a manner consistent with established patient safety policies and procedures
    - provide care in an unpredictable environment
    - manage time and establish timelines
    Example: Sets priorities in the face of multiple demands.  Maintains a calm presence regardless of a client's behavior.
  4. Sensory
    Ability to perceive with each of the following senses well enough to provide care and participate in educational activities:
    - sight
    - touch
    - hearing
    - smell
    - hand-eye coordination (manual dexterity)
    Example: Possess the sensory capacity to see well enough to read numbers on a syringe, feel a pulse, hear alarms, recognize odours and prepare a medication.
  5. Physical
    Ability to perform each of the following requisites well enough to provide client care and participate in educational activities:
    - lift
    - carry
    - stand and maintain balance
    - perform repetitive actions
    - pull and push
    - climb
    - bend
    - reach
    - walk
    - move within confined spaces
    Example: Able to provide CPR, carry a baby and reposition an adult client in bed.

Locations, Dates and Fees

Next Estimated Term 1 Start Date (subject to change)

Location Start Date Apply Link
Notre Dame Campus Aug 30, 2021 Apply Now
Winkler Campus Aug 30, 2021 Apply Now
Portage La Prairie Campus Aug 30, 2021 Apply Now

Costs (estimates only; subject to change)

Program/Student Fees
Year 1
$7,586.00
Year 2
$9,042.00
Year 3
$8,678.00
Year 4
$1,089.00
Books and Supplies
Year 1
$2,500.001
Year 2
$1,500.00
Year 3
$1,500.00
Other Fees
Year 1
$300.00
Year 2
$300.00
Year 3
$300.00
1Students are responsible for all expenses associated with clinical practice settings in all communities, facilities, and in Winnipeg city including travel and accommodations.

Students may apply for financial assistance through the Manitoba Student Aid program. For general information on applying please call 204-945-6321 or 1-800-204-1685, or visit their website at www.manitobastudentaid.ca, which also includes an online application. For detailed information, please visit one of the RRC Student Service Centres or call 204-632-2327. Applicants requiring financial assistance should complete their student loan applications well in advance of the class start date.

Red River College is a participating institution in the HigherEdPoints program. Through this program, students are able to convert Aeroplan® Miles and TD Points into funds to help cover their tuition. Family members and friends can also contribute to a student’s education by converting their loyalty points - anyone can donate their points to an individual student.

Visit the HigherEdPoints website for more information about the program and/or to set up an account to convert your points.

Courses and Descriptions

(Click the course name to view the description of the course)
Year 1
Term 1Credit Hours
PSYC-1002Psychology
3
SAFE-1028WHMIS
0
Term 2Credit Hours
Term 3Credit Hours
Year 2
Term 4Credit Hours
Term 5Credit Hours
Term 6Credit Hours
3
STAT-2000Statistics
3
Year 3
Term 7Credit Hours
Term 8Credit Hours
NRSG-3605Mental Health
3
Electives
3
Term 9Credit Hours
Year 4
Term 10Credit Hours
Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)
In addition to Transfer of Credit from a recognized post secondary institution, other RPL processes are available for RPL courses. Click here for more information. For courses with no RPL, please check www.rrc.ca/rpl for additional contact information.
ABOR-3003Health, Wellness and Indigenous Peoples Of Canada
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This course provides an overview of the history of Canadian Indigenous people pre-contact, post colonialism through to contemporary times. This history and richness of Indigenous culture provides the context for understanding the effects of sociopolitical decisions on the health and well-being of Indigenous people. The concepts of cultural sensitivity and cultural safety with respect to their role in client centered care are discussed. Specific health issues prevalent in the Indigenous population and the relationship between biomedicine and the Indigenous world view are explored. The course concludes with an overview of innovative culturally based approaches and success stories of health, healing and wellness.

Prerequisites:
ELTV-3000Elective Course
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Credit for the elective in Year 3, Term 9 will be given for courses that:
• Are university courses at the 2000 or higher level
• Have a grade of C+ or higher
• Are not repetitive of a required course in the program
• Acceptance of a course as an elective will be at the discretion of the department

 

ELTV-3001Nursing Study Away
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This course offers students the opportunity to study in another institute or setting away from their home campus at Red River College in Winnipeg. This study may take place within Manitoba, Canada, North America or in an International setting. The course provides students with an immersive experience and is intended to broaden the students' world view while examining the similarities and differences in health care within different practice settings. Students will engage as a team with students and faculty who are not from their home institute of Red River College.

MBIO-2000Nursing Microbiology
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Nursing Microbiology (formerly MBIO 1016). This course examines knowledge of medically-significant organisms, how microorganisms interact with a host and the range of defences available to the host.  Theoretical and practical exercises in the control of microorganisms are included.  Laboratory experiences reinforce the understanding of the characteristics of bacteria.

NRSG-1001The Discipline of Professional Nursing 1
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The Discipline of Professional Nursing 1: Foundational Concepts, Processes, Threads and Practices of Professional Nursing. This course is designed to introduce foundational concepts, processes, threads and practices essential to the student’s further study of nursing.  Emphasis will be placed on the program’s philosophy and conceptual framework and broad universal nursing themes like safety, critical inquiry, professionalism and scholarship.     

NRSG-1002The Discipline of Professional Nursing 2
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The Discipline of Professional Nursing 2:  The Historical, Theoretical and Philosophical Architecture of Professional NursingThis course is designed to give students an understanding of the current architectural structure of professional nursing by examining three interacting developmental perspectives: historical, philosophical and theoretical.  

Prerequisites:
NRSG-1010Communication Seminar 1: Foundation of Communication
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This course provides students with a basic understanding of the principles and practices of interpersonal communication in general, and communication in Nursing. The focus will be on self-discovery and self-awareness, and taking responsibility for ensuring the effectiveness of one’s own communication with others. 

Practical application of this information in simulated experiences provide students with the basis on which to apply this learning in the actual health-related circumstances which they may encounter in clinical practice. Core relational skills include self-awareness and attending to context.

NRSG-1020Communication Seminar 2: Therapeutic Communication
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This course expands on the learning acquired in CS1. The focus on self-awareness continues with a shift to client-centred, goal-directed therapeutic communication. Skills in therapeutic communication are practiced with application to common and challenging clinical situations. Difficult conversations, conflict management, and challenges in group dynamics are addressed. Self-awareness, being “in-relation”, collaborative knowledge development, and attending to context are core relational skills in this course.

NRSG-1030Communication Seminar 3: Communication for Growth and Change
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This course builds on CS1 and CS2 to explore ways to communicate that will facilitate client growth and change. Principles of teaching-learning and coaching will be practiced, as well as conducting therapeutic groups. Practical application of this information in simulated experiences provide students with the basis on which to apply this learning in the actual health-related circumstances which they may encounter in clinical practice. “Letting be”, collaborative knowledge development, self-reflection and reflexivity are core relational skills.

 

NRSG-1201Lifespan Human Development
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This course focuses on the knowledge, concepts, theories and research of human growth and development across the lifespan.

NRSG-1301Nursing Techniques 1
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This course provides students with the theoretical underpinnings and psychomotor activities associated with nursing techniques that focus on the maintenance of health and safety and the activities of daily living.  Lab practice is a major component of this course.  Opportunity to begin applying this learning in the practice setting occurs in NRSG 1810 - Clinical Nursing Practice 1.

 

NRSG-1302Nursing Techniques 2
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This course provides students with the theoretical underpinnings and psychomotor activities associated with nursing techniques that focus on common interventions with common health care problems.  Lab practice is a major component of this course.  Opportunity to begin applying this learning in the practice setting occurs in NRSG 1810 - Clinical Nursing Practice 1 and NRSG 1820 - Clinical Nursing Practice 2.

Prerequisites:
NRSG-1303Nursing Techniques 3
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This course provides students with the theoretical underpinnings and psychomotor activities associated with nursing techniques that focus on more complex interventions with common health care problems.  Lab practice is a major component of this course.  Opportunity to apply this learning in the practice setting begins in NRSG 1820 - Clinical Nursing Practice 2 and continues in future clinical practice courses.

Prerequisites:
NRSG-1304Health Assessment 1
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This course focuses on the physical and psychosocial assessment of adults.  The emphasis is on completion of a basic health assessment that includes a health history and common assessment techniques.  The lab component provides the opportunity to practise these skills in order to explore normal, healthy findings.   Assessment of the elderly adult is included in this course.

 

NRSG-1401Pharmacology and Diagnostics for Nursing 1
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This course introduces students to the basic knowledge, principles, processes, and practices of the disciplines of pathophysiology, pharmacology, and diagnostics from a nursing perspective. Students explore the concept of disease from a pathophysiologic perspective. In addition, they look at some basic common pathophysiologic processes. From a pharmacological perspective, the nurse's role in assessing the efficacy, side effects, adverse reaction, and interactions of drugs is explored. Lifespan, legal, ethical, and ethno-cultural considerations are emphasized. The nurse's role in patient education regarding over-the-counter medications and natural health care products are discussed. Common diagnostic tests and procedures, and the nurse's role in diagnostic testing are introduced.

NRSG-1501Scholarly Writing
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This course provides students with a focused opportunity to learn the elements of writing in a scholarly manner. How to locate and evaluate the quality of informational sources, and how to document and cite sources using APA format is emphasized. The meaning and consequences of plagiarism are addressed. Some practical opportunity to practice this learning is offered.

  • As per RRC Nursing program policies, applicants/students who fail a course are permitted to repeat that course once only. Applicants who repeat and fail this course a second time will not be eligible to apply to the LPN to BN Pathway.
  • As per RRC Nursing program policies, applicants/students are allowed only one voluntary withdrawal per course.  Applicants who voluntarily withdraw more than once from this course will not be eligible to apply to the LPN to BN Pathway.
  • A grade of 64% or less (grade C or less) is considered a failing grade.

NRSG-1810Clinical Nursing Practice - Foundations 1
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This course focuses on the clinical application of theories, concepts and techniques associated with learned coursework to date. Emphasis is on developing a basic nurse-client relational partnership, practising problem-solving and critical inquiry and building competency and efficiency in performance of learned interventions techniques with actual clients.  Practice sites are sub-acute and rehabilitative institutional settings.

Prerequisites:
NRSG-1820Clinical Nursing Practice - Foundations 2
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This course is a continuation of NRSG 1810 and remains focused on the continued clinical application of theories, concepts and techniques associated with learned coursework to date.  Emphasis is on refining the development of the nurse-client relational partnership, further practice with problem-solving and critical inquiry and continued building of competency and efficiency in performance of learned interventions with actual clients.  Practice sites continue to be sub-acute and rehabilitative settings.

Prerequisites:
NRSG-2003The Discipline of Professional Nursing 3
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The Discipline of Professional Nursing 3: Legalities, Standards and Ethical Reasoning in Professional Nursing. This course is designed to give students a theoretical and functional understanding of the laws, statutes, acts, codes of conduct and standards that govern professional nursing.  Further, this course gives students the opportunity to study the theoretical and professional basis of ethical reasoning in nursing and to practice ethical reasoning through the examination of selected case studies and current research.

Prerequisites:
NRSG-2305Health Assessment 2
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This course builds on NRSG 1304 with an emphasis on the completion of a comprehensive health history and the development of higher level assessment techniques. Normal, as well as common abnormal findings will be explored with a critical thinking approach to understanding such findings.  Pediatric assessment is also included in this course.

Prerequisites:
NRSG-2402Pharmacology & Diagnostics for Nursing 2
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This course builds on the pharmacology and diagnostics base provided in NRSG 1401. More in depth examination of pharmacological agents and diagnostics used to address specific health problems is presented.  The major classifications of pharmacological agents are explored in detail.  Case studies that examine pharmacotherapeutics and diagnostics in the context of the overall plan of care are used.  As well, the nurse’s responsibility in the broader societal issues associated with prescribed pharmacology is discussed.     

 

Prerequisites:
NRSG-2502Research and Scholarship in Nursing
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This course introduces the student to the meaning of scholarship in the broad sense and provides an overview of the methodology of both quantitative and qualitative research strategies used in nursing.  The emphasis is on providing the student with the necessary learning to be a critical consumer of nursing research and the basic skills to participate effectively in research in practice. It is recommended to complete STAT 2000 prior to taking this course.

NRSG-2601Acute Conditions in Adults: Acute Illness and the Surgical Experience
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This course examines the nurse – client relational partnership in the context of the experience of acute illness in the adult.  Concepts, processes, practices and research associated with acute illness are explored. Emphasis is on the role of the nurse in assisting clients and families with healing, recovering from surgical intervention and maintaining health once recovery has occurred.  

NRSG-2602Chronic Illness in Adults: Maintenance And Exacerbation Management
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This course examines the nurse- client relational partnership in the context of the experience of chronic and long-term health problems in the adult.  Concepts, processes, practices and research associated with chronic and long-term illness are explored.  Emphasis is on the role of the nurse in assisting clients and families with reaching and maintaining optimum health and well-being for their circumstances and health status. 

NRSG-2603Older Adult Health and Wellness
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This course examines the nurse – client relational partnership in the context of the experience of aging.  Concepts, processes, practices and research associated with the promotion of health and wellness are emphasized. Common health problems and functional consequences in the older adult are explored.  Emphasis is on the role of the nurse in assisting older adults and their families with reaching and maintaining optimum health and independence for their life stage, circumstances and individual health status. 

 

NRSG-2701Family Nursing
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This course focuses on theories, concepts, processes and practices associated with the family system. The interaction between family structure, development and functioning and health is explored. Emphasis is on the role of the nurse in relational inquiry, interaction and health promotion within the family system. 

NRSG-2702Community Health 1
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Community Health 1: Community Health Nursing. This course focuses on theories, concepts, processes, practices and research associated with community health nursing from an historical and health promotion perspective. The role of the nurse and the nurse-client relational partnership in the community setting is included.  Fieldwork is included.

NRSG-2811Clinical Practice: Older Adult Community
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This course focuses on the clinical application of concepts, processes, practices and research associated with promoting health and maintaining wellness in middle-aged and older adults and their families in community settings. Emphasis is on the development of the nurse-client relational partnership in the context of health teaching for the promotion of health and the maintenance of wellness.  Practice sites include clinics, wellness centres, assisted living centres, homes and other community settings.  

Prerequisites:
NRSG-2830Clinical Practice: Surgical Setting
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This course focuses on the clinical application of concepts, processes, practices and research associated with acute illness in adults as learned in NRSG 2601. Emphasis is on the development of the nurse-client relational partnership in the context of acute illness in the adult and the nurse’s role in assisting clients and families with healing, recovering from surgical intervention and maintaining health once recovery has occurred.  Practice sites include any area where acute illness is being addressed and may include hospitals, clinics, homes and other community settings.  

Prerequisites:
NRSG-2840Clinical Practice: Medical Setting
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This course focuses on the clinical application of concepts, processes, practices and research associated with chronic and long-term health problems in adults as learned in NRSG 2602. Emphasis is on the development of the nurse-client relational partnership in the context of chronic and long-term health problems in the adult and the nurse’s role in assisting clients and families with reaching and maintaining optimum health and well-being for their circumstances.  Practice sites include any area where chronic and long-term health problems are being addressed and may include hospitals, clinics, homes and other community settings.  

Prerequisites:
NRSG-2850Clinical Practice: Long Term Care
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This course focuses on the clinical application of concepts, processes, practices and research associated with common health problems in the older adult as learned in NRSG 2603. Emphasis is on the development of the nurse-client relational partnership in the context of the experience of aging and the nurse’s role in assisting older adults and their families with reaching and maintaining optimum health and well-being for their life stage and individual circumstances.  Practice sites include any area where common health problems of the older adult are being addressed and may include hospitals, clinics, homes and other community settings.  

Prerequisites:
NRSG-3004Leadership, Management and Interprofessional Practice (DPN4)
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The Discipline of Professional Nursing 4: Leadership and Management in Professional Nursing. This course is designed to provide students with a broad theoretical understanding of leadership as an essential component of professional nursing in all circumstances.  Further, students examine the more specific context including such concepts as change theory and agency, transformational leadership, role modeling, mentorship, the role of power and politics, team-building, networking, and conflict resolution using current theories and research on leadership and management.

Prerequisites:
NRSG-3005Policy, Politics and Professional Nursing (DPN5)
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The Discipline of Professional Nursing 5: Issues, Politics, Public Policy and Professional Nursing. This course is designed to develop political awareness and understanding of public policy as it relates to the profession of nursing and the health of society.  Students examine how politics influences public policy and the role of professional nursing in influencing public policy.  Further, students consider the role of professional nursing as a change agent for social justice and the globalization of health.

Prerequisites:
NRSG-3008Independent Study
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(No description available at this time)

NRSG-3104Advanced Counselling for Nurses
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This blended delivery course will expand on learning acquired in NRSG 1102 to incorporate a wide variety of counselling theories and how they can be applied to the nurse-client relational partnership and specific situations that nurses encounter in practice.  Theoretical foundations of counselling will provide the framework for developing professional therapeutic skills.  Specific concepts and models will be introduced to help learners understand the theory and philosophy of effective counselling intervention skills.  Opportunities to practice counselling skills will be provided in the laboratory component of the course through exercises, role-plays and simulations.  The importance of a range of skill options will be emphasized, and the opportunity for students to begin to reflect on their preferred approach will be provided.

NRSG-3202Science of Early Child Development - Nursing Focus
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This is an on-line course that explores the multimedia resource curriculum: Science of Early Child Development within a nursing perspective. Early human development is studied from a developmental health viewpoint, with a focus on the social determinants of health.  Students learn about current research in neurobiology and early human development, and the important role of early experience in lifelong human development and health.  Readings, videos, general internet links, nursing practice internet links, interactive games and on-line discussion are used to explore and analyze the latest understanding and research in early child development and the nursing implications of such data.  This course was developed collaboratively by the Early Childhood Education Program of the Red River College Community Services Department, the Atkinson Centre of the University of Toronto, The Aga Khan Developmental Network and the Red River College Nursing Department. 

Prerequisites:
NRSG-3604Perinatal and Growing Family Health
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This course examines the nurse – client relational partnership in the context of the perinatal experience, as well as the experience of families coping with health problems in young and adolescent family members.   Concepts, processes, practices and research associated with promoting a positive perinatal experience and a healthy transition to a new family structure are emphasized.   As well, concepts, processes, practices and research associated with assisting the family experiencing health problems with a child or adolescent are addressed.  Emphasis is on the role of the nurse in assisting new and growing families, and their individual members, with reaching and maintaining optimum health and well-being for their life stage, circumstances and health status.

NRSG-3605Mental Health
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This course examines the nurse – client relational partnership in the context of the individual and family experiencing mental health problems. Concepts, processes, practices and research associated with psychosocial wellness and common mental health problems are explored.  Emphasis is on the role of the nurse in assisting individuals and their families, and the community as a whole, with reaching and maintaining optimum mental health and well-being for their circumstances. 

NRSG-3606Palliative and End of Life Care
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This course examines the nurse – client relational partnership in the context of the experience of life threatening illness and end of life care.  Concepts, processes, practices and research associated with life threatening illness and end of life care are explored. Emphasis is on the role of the nurse in assisting clients and families with reaching and maintaining optimum health and well-being for their circumstances and health status, or experiencing a dignified death.

NRSG-3703Epidemiology and Illness Prevention
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This course focuses on theories, concepts, processes, practices and research associated with epidemiology, the prevention of chronic illness and the detection of health risks in the population.  Emphasis is on public health strategies for reducing risk and the nurse’s role in the promotion of health and the primary and secondary prevention of illness.

NRSG-3704Community Health 2: the Larger & Global
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Community Health 2: The Larger and Global Community as Client . This course focuses on theories, concepts, processes, practices and research associated with health promotion of the community as a whole.  Emphasis is placed on community assessment, pandemic and disaster planning, environmental stewardship and global health.  Fieldwork is included.

Prerequisites:
NRSG-3821Clinical Practice: Community Health Settings
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This course focuses on the clinical application of concepts, processes, practices and research associated with promoting health and maintaining wellness in perinatal and growing families in community settings. Emphasis is on the development of the nurse-client relational partnership in the context of health teaching for the promotion of health and the maintenance of wellness.  Practice sites include clinics, wellness centres, prenatal classes, schools, day care centres, homes and other community settings.

Prerequisites:
NRSG-3860Clinical Practice: Maternity Setting
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This course focuses on the clinical application of concepts, processes, practices and research associated with the perinatal experience and becoming a new family as learned in NRSG 2604.  Emphasis is on the development of the nurse-client relational partnership in the context of assisting the individual mother and newborn, and the new family, with reaching and maintaining optimum health and well-being for their life stage and circumstances.   Practice sites include hospitals, clinics, homes and other community settings.  

NRSG-3870Clinical Practice: Pediatric Setting
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This course focuses on the clinical application of concepts, processes, practices and research associated with families experiencing health problems with a child or adolescent as learned in NRSG 2604.  Emphasis is on the development of the nurse-client relational partnership in the context of assisting the child or adolescent and their family with reaching and maintaining optimum health and well-being for their life stage and circumstances.  Practice sites include hospitals, clinics, homes and other community settings.  

NRSG-3880Clinical Practice: Mental Health Setting
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This course focuses on the clinical application of concepts, processes, practices and research associated psychosocial wellness and mental health problems as learned in NRSG 3605.  Emphasis is on the development of the nurse-client relational partnership in the context of assisting individuals and their families with reaching and maintaining optimum mental health and well-being for their circumstances.  Practice sites include hospitals, clinics, homes and other community settings.  

Prerequisites:
NRSG-3890Clinical Practice: Palliative Care Setting
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This course focuses on the clinical application of concepts, processes, practices and research associated with complex system failure and life-threatening health problems as learned in NRSG 3606. Emphasis is on the development of the nurse-client relational partnership in the context of assisting clients and families with reaching and maintaining optimum health and well-being for their circumstances or experiencing a dignified death.  Practice sites include hospitals, clinics, hospices, homes and other community settings.  

 

NRSG-3901Oncology Nursing
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This course examines the nurse-client relational partnership in the context of the lived experience of the cancer journey across the illness trajectory. The cancer continuum concepts, processes, practices and research includes prevention, screening, early detection, diagnosis, treatment, symptom management, education, supportive care, rehabilitation, survivor ship and palliative care.  Emphasis on the role of the nurse in assisting clients with a cancer diagnosis to reach and maintain optimum health and well-being is explored.

Prerequisites:
NRSG-3902Understanding Substance Use Disorders: A Nursing Perspective
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Drug and alcohol addiction is under-recognized from both a societal and health care perspective in Canada. Health care costs associated with the addictions are significant.  Nurses require more education regarding effective and humane approaches to recognizing and reducing the harm associated with these health issues. This course will examine drug and alcohol addiction from a chronic illness trajectory.  Content will include the neurobiology of addiction, the short and long term physical effects of drugs and alcohol; pertinent concepts associated with addiction & contemporary perspectives regarding treatment. The role of the individual nurse and the nursing profession in addressing this major health problem in modern society is discussed.   

Prerequisites:
NRSG-3903Essentials of Wound Care
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This blended delivery (online and in class) course examines wound care in a holistic manner. Content includes wound healing physiology; factors influencing wound healing; principles of wound management; and the impact, etiology and classification of wounds. As well the intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting the client with wounds will be examined. Evidence-informed knowledge, critical thinking, critical inquiry, and clinical judgment will be utilized to develop care plans for a variety of wounds. In class exemplars via case study will be utilized to examine all aspects of client care and to integrate theory learned.

Prerequisites:
NRSG-4810Senior Consolidated Practicum
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This is a concentrated pre-graduation practicum experience that provides the student the opportunity to consolidate and hone all their program learning under the guidance of a preceptor from the clinical practice setting.  The emphasis is on acquiring competence and confidence as a beginning professional nurse and ensuring that the entry-level competencies for Registered Nurses in Manitoba have been achieved.  Selected seminars on relevant topics associated with the transition to new graduate are included.

NRSG-9000Preparation for Senior Consolidated Practicum
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(No description available at this time)

NUTR-1000Human Nutrition and Lifestyle
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This course provides an introduction to the sources, actions and interactions of nutrients that produce energy for life.  The relationship of nutrition to health and a healthy lifestyle is emphasized.  Further, the nutritional needs of specific developmental groups throughout the lifespan are addressed.

PSYC-1002Psychology
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This course explores the major areas of modern psychology. Key topics include sensation, cognition, learning, motivation, emotional behaviour, stress, methods of coping/adapting, brain structure and function and psychopathology. Fundamental principles of the scientific method and research design are emphasized. Students are expected to gain insight into the roots of human behaviour from both a biological and psychological perspective.

PSYC-3011Abnormal Psychology
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This course explores the major components of modern abnormal psychology.  It begins with a brief introduction to the science of psychopathology and the research methods used to assess and diagnose psychological disorders.  It then moves into psychological disorders of childhood, continues through the various psychopathologies in adulthood, and concludes with cognitive disorders related to aging.  The scientific method is stressed throughout the course and emphasis is placed on how information about psychopathology is gathered, interpreted and applied to treatment. Additional emphasis is placed on the physiological (i.e. brain-related) aspects of each psychopathology. The course will expose students to the following specific psychopathologies: ADHD, autism, dyslexia, anxiety disorders, mood disorders, eating and sleeping disorders, schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, personality disorders, sexual and gender identity disorders, substance-related disorders, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders associated with aging.

Prerequisites:
SAFE-1028WHMIS
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The Workplace Hazardous Materials System (WHMIS) is a system for ensuring that important information about hazardous products is communicated where products are used, stored and handled. This course provides Information necessary to understand and interpret information about hazardous products, including pictograms (symbols), labels and Safety Data Sheets.

SOSC-3003Gender Studies for Health Professionals
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Relational nursing practice emphasizes the nurse and client partnership. This partnership is predicated on understanding, compassion, and empathy towards all clients. It is therefore crucial that nurses analyze how gender frames both themselves and their clients. This course will utilize gender, queer, and nursing theory to redefine, question, critique, and challenge concepts related to gender. Beginning with broad concepts of gender normativity and gender performativity, students will explore gender roles and the impact these roles have on their lives and their nursing care. Focusing in with feminist theory, students will then critique patriarchal ideologies that create unique challenges for women and perpetuate gendered violence; however, the concept of intersectionality will be introduced to explore how discrimination and oppression are not framed by gender alone. The course will then redefine the concept of gender itself, as students deconstruct the male/female binary and work towards an inclusive conception of gender that acknowledges individual identities inside and outside the traditional gender binary. This course seeks to illuminate and challenge students’ personal biases towards gender and how those biases could both positively and negatively influence client care.

Disclaimer: The content of this course focuses on some controversial and uncomfortable topics. Readings may be graphic and include explicit language. Some content may be challenging for students. As the course seeks to illuminate and challenge students’ personal biases towards gender, it is important to acknowledge, confront, and discuss topics both inside and outside personal comfort zones. Respectful debate is integral to gender studies for health professionals.

Prerequisites:
STAT-2000Statistics
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This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and processes of basic statistical analysis and the inferences that can be drawn from such analysis.

ZOOL-1073Pathophysiology 1
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This course introduces the foundational concepts of pathophysiology and core pathologic themes irrespective of particular disease processes. The focus is on general etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations, and provides a framework for the understanding of common pathophysiological processes.

  • Attention LPNs - If you are currently working as an LPN in Manitoba or completed your LPN program at Assiniboine Community College (ACC) you will not be required to complete the pre-requisite courses.  All other LPNs will need to either complete the pre-requisite courses or contact RRC’s Nursing department to confirm if courses similar to the pre-requisites were completed in their LPN program.
  • As per RRC Nursing program policies, applicants/students who fail a course are permitted to repeat that course once only. Applicants who repeat and fail this course a second time will not be eligible to apply to the LPN to BN Pathway.
  • As per RRC Nursing program policies, applicants/students are allowed only one voluntary withdrawal per course.  Applicants who voluntarily withdraw more than once from this course will not be eligible to apply to the LPN to BN Pathway.
  • A grade of 64% or less (grade C or less) is considered a failing grade.

Prerequisites:
ZOOL-2074Pathophysiology 2
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This course expands on the fundamental pathophysiological knowledge addressed in Pathophysiology 1. Core themes that underlie organ system pathophysiology are examined and concepts are illustrated through discussion of specific disease entities. The focus is on etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations, and provides a framework for the understanding of complex pathophysiological processes.

Prerequisites:

Computer/Laptop Requirements

Online learning is a critical component of course delivery in all Red River College programs. To ensure each student has the tools they need to achieve their academic goals, all Red River College students require, at minimum:

1.  Off-campus access to a current computer with a webcam

2.  A high speed internet connection

• Recommended minimum speed: 10 mbps for download, 3 mbps for upload
• Slower internet connection speeds may result in audio and video issues. Please keep in mind that if others in your home are using the same internet connection at the same time as you are, you may also experience audio and video issues.
• Please refer to https://www.rrc.ca/studentcomputing for further information on Computer Requirements for Students.


Please note that any anticipated costs are not included in Books and Supplies estimates.

Transfer Credit Opportunities

If you are interested in taking courses while waiting to get into the Nursing program you may complete and request transfer credit for one course in each subject area listed below.

A minimum grade of C+ must be attained to transfer one of the following Human Nutrition and Lifestyle, Lifespan Human Development, Nursing Microbiology, and/or Psychology courses into the program.

Human Nutrition and Lifestyle

  • RRC - NUTR-1000
  • U of M - HNSC 1210
  • U of W - KIN 1601
  • Athabasca University - NUTR 330 or NUTR 331
  • Brandon University - 71.153

Lifespan Human Development

  • U of M - NURS 1260 or FMLY 1010
  • Brandon University - 71.155 or 69.151 

Nursing Microbiology

  • RRC - MBIO-2000
  • U of M - MBIO 1220
  • U of W - no equivalency
  • Brandon University - 15.264
  • CMU - BIOL 1350
  • ACC - SCIE 0073

Psychology

  • RRC - SOSC 3001 or PSYC 1002
  • U of M - PSYC 1200
  • U of W - PSYC 1000/6
  • ACC - PSSY 0026

A minimum grade of C must be attained to transfer one of the following Statistics courses into the program.

Statistics

  • RRC - MATH 1059 or MATH 1020
  • U of M - STAT 1000
  • U of W - SOC 2125, STAT 1501/3 or STAT 2001
  • Brandon University - 62.171
  • CMU - MATH 1000
  • ACC - MATH 0002

To register for RRC courses visit our list of Continuing Education courses.

For all other courses, please contact the institution for information on course schedules, delivery methods, fees, etc.

Recognition of Prior Learning

 

Graduate Employment Report

Red River College surveys its graduates on an annual basis to collect data related to the graduates’ employment status, salary, occupation and skill use. In addition, graduates are asked to indicate their level of satisfaction regarding the education they received at Red River College.

Visit www.rrc.ca/numbers/reports/graduate-satisfaction for graduate satisfaction and employment reports.

Employment Potential

Graduates of the Nursing program will have the educational credentials to be employed in all areas where the expertise of a professional RN is required.

Contact Information

For general information about this program or how to apply, contact Enrolment Services at 204-632-2327.

Learn about this program by ATTENDING AN INFORMATION SESSION. The session is approximately 60-90 minutes and will cover general program information, admission requirements, and how to apply. Sign up for a session that best fits your schedule.

If, after attending an information session, you have questions about the application process or admission requirements, we recommend you book an appointment with an Academic Advisor. Appointments are available Monday to Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone appointments can be arranged for your convenience. To book an appointment please visit one of the Student Service Centres, call 204-632-2327, or e-mail advisor@rrc.ca

If you have program specific questions you can contact:
Joanna Simmons-Swinden
Room C614, Notre Dame Campus
204-632-3019
E-mail: jsimmonsswinden@rrc.ca 

Admitted students may submit their criminal record and abuse registry check documents by mail to:
Laurie-Ann Nichol
Nursing Department
Red River College
Room C517 - 2055 Notre Dame Avenue
Winnipeg, MB  R3H 0J9
204-632-2230
E-mail: lanichol@rrc.ca


How to Apply

For information on how to apply to this program, follow the link below.

www.rrc.ca/howtoapply

Student Evaluation of Program

Every year Red River College surveys students, in all full-time programs, to learn more about their college experience. The questionnaire includes questions about students’ experiences with College programs, facilities, and services offered.

Visit www.rrc.ca/numbers/reports/student-evaluation-of-program for student evaluation of program reports.

College Support Services

Red River College is committed to student success and provides valuable support services to assist in helping students make the most of their time at RRC.

Visit www.rrc.ca/supports for more information.

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Red River College endeavours to provide the most current version of all program and course information on this website. Please be advised that classes may be scheduled between 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. The College reserves the right to modify or cancel any course, program, process, or procedure without notice or prejudice. Fees may change without notice.