LIBIF-DP Library and Information Technology

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Overview

  • Two-year diploma
  • September entry date
  • Exchange District Campus (formerly Princess Street Campus), Winnipeg
  • Work experience
  • Laptop delivery
  • Credit transfer opportunities: Athabasca University
  • If you have a criminal record or are listed on a Child Abuse Registry, you may not be able to complete this program. See Program Progression Requirements for more info.
  • International applicants, please visit Academic Program, Dates and Fees for a listing of programs for international students, current availability and online application instructions.

Description
This program provides you with the necessary public service and technical skills to be a productive employee in the library and related fields. Specifically, the program provides you with the training to be employed as a library technician.

You will learn the fundamentals of both manual and automated systems for acquiring, organizing, and disseminating information in a variety of formats.

Oral presentations, written assignments, and group projects are part of the program.

Students complete three two-week field placements in a variety of libraries over the course of the program.

Admission Requirements

If your academic history includes any of the following, please visit me.rrc.mb.ca/Catalogue/Information/MyEducation for important information: post-secondary studies at an institution other than Red River College; Modified (M), English as an Additional Language (E), or GED high school courses; or home schooling.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS ARE DUE WITHIN 30 DAYS OF APPLYING (unless otherwise noted below).

However, if you apply within 6 weeks of the program start date, admission requirements are due within 5 days of applying.

Regular Admission Requirements

  1. Grade 12
    • Submit proof of graduation from or enrolment in Grade 12, including one credit in:
      • Grade 12 English
    • If you provide proof of enrolment at time of application, your official final grades indicating successful completion must be submitted by July 15 for fall enrolment or by the deadline specified in your admission letter.
    • If you are required to complete an English language assessment, do not submit your transcripts until requested to do so.  See English Language Requirements (ELRs) for more information.
      and
  2. Degrees of Reading Power (DRP) or English Language Assessment (ELA)
    • Before applying, determine which assessment (DRP or ELA) is appropriate for your situation
    • We strongly advise you complete the assessment before submitting your application to ensure you meet requirements
    • Assessment results must be dated no more than two years prior to your application date
  3. Applicant Declaration for Check Documents Form
  4. Essay
    • Submit a two-page essay that describes:
      • What in your background and experience makes you a good candidate for working in the Library and Information Technology field?
      • Three reasons libraries are still important in contemporary society.
    • Essay instructions:
      • A personal, first-person voice is recommended.
      • Include your name and an appropriate title on the first page.
      • Font: use Times New Roman, 10 to 12 point.
      • Margins should be one inch on each side.
      • Include page numbers.
      • Single space within paragraphs and double space between paragraphs.
      • Essays should follow MLA (Modern Language Association) or APA (American Psychological Association) styles.
      • There is no minimal number of sources required, and citations can be included on an extra page as necessary.

Mature Student Admission Requirements
If you are 19 years of age or older on or before September 30 in your year of registration, have been out of high school for a minimum of one year, and you do not meet the regular admission requirements, you may apply under the special admission requirements.

  1. Academic Requirement
    • High school graduation is not required, but you must have successfully completed or be enrolled in:
      • One credit of Grade 12 English
        or
      • RRC's Introduction to Business program (this program is no longer offered by the College)
        Note: COMP-1975 Business Computing is a required credit for the Library and Information Technology (LIT) diploma. However, ACCT-1971 Financial Accounting 1 and BUSA-1093 Introduction to Business have no value to the LIT diploma and therefore are not dual credit.
    • If you provide proof of enrolment at time of application, your official final grades indicating successful completion must be submitted by July 15 for fall enrolment or by the deadline specified in your admission letter.
    • If you are required to complete an English language assessment, do not submit your transcripts until requested to do so.  See English Language Requirements (ELRs) for more information.
      and
  2. Meet Regular Admission Requirements 2 through 4

Program Progression Requirements
Program progression requirements are not due within 30 days of applying. These requirements have expiration dates and should be completed close to your program start date. Further information will be provided by the College at a later date.

After acceptance into the program but prior to registration into certain courses, you will be required to submit the following:

  • An original official Adult Criminal Record Check including Vulnerable Sector Search (ACRVS)
  • An original official Child Abuse Registry (CAR) Check (provincial)
  • An original official Adult Abuse Registry (AAR) Check (provincial)

If you have a criminal record you may not be able to complete the program.

If you are listed on a Child Abuse Registry or Adult Abuse Registry you will not be able to complete the program.

English Language Assessments

English Language AssessmentMinimum Required Levels
L - Listening, S - Speaking, R - Reading, W - WritingLSRW
AEPUCE (Academic English Program of University and College Entrance )
8888
CAEL (Canadian Academic English Language)
60606060
CLB (LINC) (Canadian Language Benchmark (Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada))
Canadian Citizens: LINC programs are not available.
8888
CanTEST (Canadian Test of English for Scholars and Trainees)
RRC Institutional or Official CanTEST accepted EXCEPT for the Medical Laboratory Sciences (MLS) program. The MLS program requires the Official CanTEST (the RRC Institutional CanTEST will not be accepted).
4.54.54.54.0
IELTS - Academic (International English Language Testing System)
6.56.56.56.5
TOEFL-iBT (Test of English as a Foreign Language - internet Based Test)
20201924

Who Should Enrol?

You will need basic computer skills, and you should be familiar with searching the Internet for information.

Library technicians are team players and work closely with the public. They must have better-than-average command of oral and written English language communication skills.

Technicians should have very good organizational skills, demonstrate initiative, and possess a flexible attitude. They frequently work with computers and a variety of other technologies, they must pay close attention to detail, and they must complete tasks with a high degree of accuracy.

Locations, Dates and Fees

Next Estimated Term 1 Start Date (subject to change)

Location Start Date Apply Link
Roblin Centre (Prev. PSC) Aug 31, 2020 Apply now

Costs (estimates only; subject to change)

Program/Student Fees
Year 1
$4,587.00
Year 2
$4,587.00
Books and Supplies
Year 1
$1,210.001
Year 2
$140.00
Other Fees
Year 1
$90.002
Year 2
$60.003
Program/Student Fees (International)
Year 1
$15,497.00
Year 2
$15,497.00
1Includes estimate of $600 for the purchase of a laptop.
2Fees for Criminal Record Check, Child Abuse Registry check and Adult Abuse Registry check.
3Fees for Criminal Record Check, Child Abuse Registry check and Adult Abuse Registry check.

Students may apply for financial assistance through the Manitoba Student Aid program. For general information on applying please call 204-945-6321 or 1-800-204-1685, or visit their website at www.manitobastudentaid.ca, which also includes an online application. For detailed information, please visit one of the RRC Student Service Centres or call 204-632-2327. Applicants requiring financial assistance should complete their student loan applications well in advance of the class start date.

Red River College is a participating institution in the HigherEdPoints program. Through this program, students are able to convert Aeroplan® Miles and TD Points into funds to help cover their tuition. Family members and friends can also contribute to a student’s education by converting their loyalty points - anyone can donate their points to an individual student.

Visit the HigherEdPoints website for more information about the program and/or to set up an account to convert your points.

Courses and Descriptions

(Click the course name to view the description of the course)
Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)
In addition to Transfer of Credit from a recognized post secondary institution, other RPL processes are available for RPL courses. Click here for more information. For courses with no RPL, please check www.rrc.ca/rpl for additional contact information.
COMM-1124Communications 1RPL
More Information

Library technicians are expected to communicate their services to the public, which often involves creating written documents, such as pathfinders, bibliographies, book reviews, and readers’ advisory lists. It is also necessary for library technicians to be able to think critically when determining which services and materials to provide to the public; thus, the ability to communicate clearly and effectively in writing is essential to providing strong service in the library.

This course is designed for students to develop foundational writing skills necessary for working in a library setting. The writing process will begin with pre-writing skills, reading, writing, editing and revising. Students will explore grammar, mechanics, a variety of writing types and documentation. Students will begin with paragraph writing for short papers. They will examine, practice and work on different essay types, critique articles, research topics and apply proper documentation using MLA and APA style.

COMM-2070Communications 2RPL
More Information

Students will learn techniques and processes involved in writing and speaking effectively in a professional setting. Students will review fundamental writing skills while applying these skills to routine types of library communication: letters, memos, short presentations and business reports.

Prerequisites:
COMM-2074Communications 3
More Information

This course focuses on the further development of the oral and written communication skills required by those working in the library field, with a focus on resume and cover letter writing, interview skills and marketing yourself for your future career.

Prerequisites:
COMP-1975Business ComputingRPL
More Information

Business Computing is a hands-on course in which students develop skills in the use of current Microsoft productivity software. Topics include introductory and intermediate skills in Microsoft Windows, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint as well as the integration of these applications.

LIBR-1003Cataloguing: Library of CongressRPL
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This course is a general introduction to all aspects of subject cataloguing. You will acquire skills in assigning Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), Library of Congress Subject Headings for Children (AC), and Canadian Subject Headings (CSH). Cross-references and authority records are covered. Other specialized indexing is briefly covered. You will learn to create call numbers using the Library of Congress Classification scheme and Cutter-Sanborn book numbers.

Prerequisites:
LIBR-1011Records Management
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Records Management covers procedures and methods used by records management personnel in organizing their collections. This course is designed to enable students to gain an understanding of the records management system.

LIBR-1012Archives and Preservation
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Archives and Preservation introduces students to archival principles. The study of the theory and practice of acquiring, appraising and accessioning records is taught.

LIBR-1026Introduction to LibrariesRPL
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This course is an introduction to various types of libraries, their organization, purpose, function and services.  Students are introduced to library terminology and are taught skills in the use of libraries.  Students acquire skills in basic library procedures such as simple book repair, materials processing, shelving and all aspects of circulation.  Procedural variations according to type of library are also covered.  Students visit a variety of libraries.  Levels of library employees are studied with particular emphasis on the role and duties of library technicians.  The importance of professional associations is covered.

LIBR-1041Cataloguing: IntroductionRPL
More Information

This course is an introduction to descriptive cataloguing in machine-readable format (MARC) of monographs using Resource Description and Access Cataloguing Rules [RDA]. You will learn to choose appropriate access points and preferred form of personal and corporate names, cross-references for names and name authorities. You will be introduced to procedures for acquiring cataloguing copy, and how to use cataloguing modules in a variety of library-automated systems. Filing according to the latest edition of ALA filing rules is briefly covered.

Prerequisites:
LIBR-1043Internet ResearchRPL
More Information

Internet tools will be explored in-depth. Topics will include browsers and search engines, free and fee-based databases, listservs, newsgroups, blogs, wikis and other information resources on the Web.

LIBR-1044Multimedia Services
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You will learn to operate and maintain equipment as well as how to use new electronic media to provide service to library patrons and staff. You will study safety and security issues and criteria for the selection and purchase of equipment. The course also introduces you to types of major non-print formats and their storage, handling, preservation, circulation and scheduling.

LIBR-1045Collection Development and AcquisitionsRPL
More Information

Learn the basic techniques in collection development, community analysis, needs assessment and collection development policy. You will learn selection, verification, ordering and receiving procedures for books, serials, French and foreign language materials, pamphlets and government publications. Acquisitions procedures for handling gifts and exchanges and weeding are also covered. You will learn to create and maintain vertical files. You will examine the organization and function of the acquisitions department and its automation.

Prerequisites:
LIBR-1046Introduction to ReferenceRPL
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You will be introduced to the reference process with emphasis on both print and electronic sources used to answer ready reference questions. Types of sources include encyclopedias, dictionaries, directories, almanacs, periodical indexes, yearbooks and bibliographies. You will also learn how to conduct an reference interview. Basic bibliographic instruction and the creation of subject bibliographies and pathfinders are covered. You will learn interlibrary loan procedures and other methods of document delivery. Specialized services in various types of libraries are discussed.

Prerequisites:
LIBR-1047Readers' Advisory for Children
More Information

Readers’ Advisory for Children provides an introduction to books for children from preschool to tweens, including picture books, easy readers, transitional fiction, genre novels, graphic novels, and popular nonfiction; and how to recommend these books to youth. We will discover methods to determine what a young person might like to read, and how to recommend and market books to children. Several different genres of literature written for young people will be examined. You will prepare and present different techniques for bringing children and books together: reading aloud/storytelling, writing annotations, using readers’ advisory websites and book talking. Current issues affecting children’s literature will also be discussed.

LIBR-2003Cataloguing: Dewey Decimal SystemsRPL
More Information

This course continues the introduction to all aspects of subject cataloguing. You will acquire skills in using the Sears Subject Headings and in creating call numbers using the Dewey Decimal Classification scheme and Cutter-Sanborn book numbers. Cross-references and authority records are covered.

Prerequisites:
LIBR-2004Cataloguing: Multimedia ResourcesRPL
More Information

This course provides a further look at bibliographic description concentrating on non-print materials and serials.

Prerequisites:
LIBR-2015Reference: Social Sciences and Humanities
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This course provides you with the opportunity to become familiar with the types of information resources pertaining to specialized disciplines within the social sciences and humanities fields. Emphasis will be placed on electronic resources including databases and web sites, but you are also expected to become familiar with print resources and specialized library collections for each discipline. The role of current awareness services and the needs of clients in various types of libraries are covered.

Prerequisites:
LIBR-2017Canadian Government & Contemporary Canadian Issues
More Information

This course is selective study of Canadian politics with emphasis on multiple viewpoints pertaining to federal as well as provincial and municipal politics. The implications on policy formation and political behaviour of such factors as culture, regional diversity, the economy, labour, business and Canada's close ties with the USA are examined.

Prerequisites:
LIBR-2018Readers' Advisory for Young Adults
More Information

Readers’ Advisory for Young Adults provides an introduction to books for teens from ages 12-18, including, genre fiction, contemporary fiction, nonfiction, alternative formats, and books for reluctant readers. Through individual and group exercises, we will discover methods to determine what a young person might like to read and how to suggest and promote materials to those reading interests. You will prepare and present different techniques for bringing teens and books together, including creating: read-alike lists, book trailers, teen library programs, and giving presentations on teen books and authors. Current issues affecting literature for teens will also be discussed.

Prerequisites:
LIBR-2019Reference: Science & Technology
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This course provides you with an introduction to the information resources available in a variety of science and technology disciplines. Emphasis is on the types of information sources available in each discipline, including databases, web sites, print resources, and specialized library collections. Also covered are some of the trends in scientific communication and publishing and their effect on library service.

Prerequisites:
LIBR-2021Issues in Libraries
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You will be introduced to current management issues in libraries such as respectful workplace, employment equity, workplace health, safety, copyright, Internet filtering, etc.

LIBR-2022Readers' Advisory for Adults
More Information

Readers’ advisory is a service libraries provide to help patrons directly or indirectly locate reading materials appropriate to their needs. In this course, you will become familiar with reader’s advisory work for adults, particularly in the public library context. However, the methods used and issues presented will also readily apply to a wider variety of libraries and reading material. The primary issues of discussion and lecture will include, but may not be limited to: indirect and direct readers’ advisory for adults; reading appeals in genre fiction and popular non-fiction; and RA resources and tools for library technicians.

Prerequisites:
LIBR-2081Marketing the Library & Information Services
More Information

You will be introduced to promoting library use and marketing the library through print and non-print media.

Prerequisites:
MGMT-1036Human Relations in Libraries
More Information

Human relations involves the study and understanding of how people work together in groups, satisfying both individual needs and group objectives. The knowledge of human relations is important to the success of any workplace environment. The focus of this course will be to develop an understanding of the needs and behaviour of individuals and groups, with a specific focus on library settings and situations.

SEMR-3479Field Placement 3
More Information

You will work full-time in a library under the supervision of qualified librarians or library technicians for a two-week period. The field placement provides an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in courses to practical workplace settings and situations

Prerequisites:
SEMR-9083Field Placement 1RPL
More Information

You will work full-time in a library under the supervision of qualified librarians or library technicians for a two-week period. The field placement provides an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in courses to practical workplace settings and situations.


Prerequisites:
SEMR-9365Field Placement 2
More Information

You will work full-time in a library under the supervision of qualified librarians or library technicians for a two-week period. The field placement provides an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in courses to practical workplace settings and situations.

Prerequisites:

CO-OP/Practicum Information

You must complete three two-week field placements in a variety of libraries.

To be eligible to register for the field placements, you must submit Adult Criminal Record/Vulnerable Sector Check (ACRVS) and Provincial Child Abuse Registry (PCAR) Check documents, dated no more than six months prior to you attending the field placement. You must submit original documents. For more information, see https://www.rrc.ca/supports/student-records/police-information-check/

Current Staff of Libraries
If you wish your library to be on the list of potential sites for student work placements, please contact Library and Information Technology coordinator Kelly Stifora (rstifora@rrc.ca) or faculty member Tabitha Nordby (tnordby@rrc.ca). 

Before a student is assigned to your library, instructors from the Library and Information Technology program will confirm that you are still willing to be a placement site and will forward documentation to you at that time.

We cannot guarantee a student placement for each library that applies.

Laptop Delivery

You will be required to purchase a laptop computer and related software for use throughout the program.

The use of laptop computers is an integral part of this program. It will enhance your learning and competitiveness in the job market. This universal-access approach to learning is a shared one between students and the College. Laptop and software specifications will be provided to you by the College after you are accepted into the program to ensure the laptop complies with current program requirements.

Do not purchase a laptop until you have been accepted and registered in the program.

Laptop Requirements current to June 13, 2017:
Students in this program are required to bring their own PC laptop that meets or exceeds the following specifications for the start of classes:
1) A laptop with a dual-core CPU
2) Minimum 2GB RAM (recommended 4GB)
3) DVD drive (optional)
4) Wireless N capability
5) Windows 10 operating system installed
6) Microsoft Office 2016 or University 365 installed (registered RRC students can access and install Microsoft Office for free through their online RRC HUB account - for more information, please visit https://www.rrc.ca/its/help-resources/office-365/) 
7) A web browser installed

Please note that Mac laptops, NetBooks, and tablet devices (e.g. iPads) are not acceptable. Students should arrive for orientation on the first day of classes with their laptops and at least a web browser installed and ready for use. Students are responsible for ensuring that their laptop has up-to-date antivirus/security software installed.

Also note that, for the first year COMP-1975 Business Computing class, students must purchase a custom textbook, available from the campus bookstore (be sure to get the correct book by checking the ISBN, and if you are unsure of which text to purchase, hold off on purchasing the text until classes have begun and you can confirm the best option with your Business Computing instructor during week one):

  • Title: COMP-1975 Business Computing, Custom Publication for Red River College
  • Publisher: Nelson Publishing
  • ISBN: 9780176782498

Further computer software required for the program will be provided as needed in class after the program start date. The College will also provide network access and help desk support should you require assistance. You will have on-campus access to e-mail, College networks, and the Internet.

Off-campus access to the Internet is the responsibility of the student.

Recent Changes

LIBR-1332 Internet Research replaced COMP-1000 Internet Essentials

LIBR-1035 Multimedia Services replaced BUSA-1001 A/V & Office Equipment & Materials

LIBR-1003 Cataloguing: Library of Congress plus LIBR-2001 Cataloguing: Dewey Decimal replaced LIBR-1013 Bibliographic Database Management: Subject Analysis

COMM-2074 Communications 3 formerly called COMM-2074 Career Writing

LIBR-1006 Readers' Advisory for Children and LIBR-2006 Readers' Advisory for Young Adults replaced LIBR-1015 Children's and Young Adult Literature

LIBR-2000 Readers' Advisory for Adults replaced LIBR-2008 Canadian Literature

LIBR-2105 Issues in Libraries formerly called LIBR-2105 Issues in Library Management

LIBR-2172 Cataloguing: Multimedia formerly called LIBR-2172 Non-Print & Electronic Resources

March 2017 course code updates:

LIBR-1020 Cataloguing: Introduction changed to LIBR-1041 Cataloguing: Introduction

LIBR-1035 Multimedia Services changed to LIBR-1044 Multimedia Services

LIBR-1332 Internet Research changed to LIBR-1043 Internet Research

COMM-1055 Communications 2 changed to COMM-2070 Communications 2

LIBR-1006 Readers' Advisory for Children changed to LIBR-1047 Readers' Advisory for Children

LIBR-1018 Collection Development and Acquisitions changed to LIBR-1045 Collection Development and Acquisitions

LIBR-1029 Introduction to Reference changed to LIBR-1046 Introduction to Reference

LIBR-2001 Cataloguing; Dewey Decimal System changed to LIBR-2003 Cataloguing: Dewey Decimal System

LIBR-2002 Readers' Advisory for Young Adults changed to LIBR-2018 Readers' Advisory for Young Adults

LIBR-2006 Canadian Government & Contemporary Canadian Issues changed to LIBR-2017 Canadian Government & Contemporary Canadian Issues

LIBR-2056 Reference: Social Sciences and Humanities changed to LIBR-2015 Reference: Social Sciences and Humanities

LIBR-2000 Readers' Advisory for Adults changed to LIBR-2022 Readers' Advisory for Adults

LIBR-2054 Reference: Science & Technology changed to LIBR-2019 Reference: Science & Technology

LIBR-2105 Issues in Libraries changed to LIBR-2021 Issues in Libraries

LIBR-2172 Cataloguing: Multimedia Resources changed to LIBR-2004 Cataloguing: Multimedia Resources

MGMT-1023 Human Relations in Libraries changed to MGMT-1036 Human Relations in Libraries

Effective with the 2017-2018 academic year, LIBR-2204 Records Management / Archives and Preservation will be split into two individual courses: LIBR-1011 Records Management and LIBR-1012 Archives and Preservation


Transfer Credit Opportunities

The following university offers credit for the Library and Information Technology program.

Athabasca University
Graduates of this program can receive two years credit toward the Bachelor of Professional Arts (Communication Studies) at Athabasca University.

Recognition of Prior Learning

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is a process which documents and compares an individual's prior learning gained from prior education, work and life experiences and personal study to the learning outcomes in College courses/programs. For more information, please visit www.rrc.ca/rpl.

Other Information

You must complete three two-week field placements in a variety of libraries.

To be eligible to register for the field placements, you must submit Adult Criminal Record/Vulnerable Sector Check (ACRVS) and Provincial Child Abuse Registry (PCAR) Check documents, dated no more than six months prior to you attending the field placement. You must submit original documents. For more information, see https://www.rrc.ca/supports/student-records/police-information-check/

Current Staff of Libraries

If you wish your library to be on the list of potential sites for student work placements, please contact Library and Information Technology coordinator Kelly Stifora (rstifora@rrc.ca) or faculty member Tabitha Nordby (tnordby@rrc.ca).  

Before a student is assigned to your library, instructors from the Library and Information Technology program will confirm that you are still willing to be a placement site and will forward documentation to you at that time.

We cannot guarantee a student placement for each library that applies.

Graduate Employment Report

Red River College surveys its graduates on an annual basis to collect data related to the graduates’ employment status, salary, occupation and skill use. In addition, graduates are asked to indicate their level of satisfaction regarding the education they received at Red River College.

Visit www.rrc.ca/numbers/reports/graduate-satisfaction for graduate satisfaction and employment reports.

Employment Potential

Library technicians occupy mid-range positions with a level of responsibility between that of a clerk and a librarian. They may direct clerks, student assistants, or other library technicians. Duties may be limited to a specific area within a technical or public service unit of a library or may cover a wide range of activities, depending on the size of the library. Technicians may also manage small libraries.

Opportunities also exist in fields such as corporate or political research, publishing, computerized information systems, and bibliographic utilities.

Contact Information

For general information about this program or how to apply, contact Enrolment Services at 204-632-2327.

For detailed program information, contact:

Kelly Stifora
Coordinator
204-949-8517
E-mail: rstifora@rrc.ca

Admitted students may submit their criminal record and abuse registry check documents to the above individual.

How to Apply

For information on how to apply to this program, follow the link below.

www.rrc.ca/howtoapply

Student Evaluation of Program

Every year Red River College surveys students, in all full-time programs, to learn more about their college experience. The questionnaire includes questions about students’ experiences with College programs, facilities, and services offered.

Visit www.rrc.ca/numbers/reports/student-evaluation-of-program for student evaluation of program reports.

College Support Services

Red River College is committed to student success and provides valuable support services to assist in helping students make the most of their time at RRC.

Visit www.rrc.ca/supports for more information.

Page produced on 2019-11-11 18:17:48
Red River College endeavours to provide the most current version of all program and course information on this website. Please be advised that classes may be scheduled between 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. The College reserves the right to modify or cancel any course, program, process, or procedure without notice or prejudice. Fees may change without notice.