FULL-TIME | INTERLAKE CAMPUS SOCCF-DP Social Innovation and Community Development

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Overview

  • Two-year diploma
  • September entry date
  • Optional one-year certificate exit
  • Offered at the Innovation Centre, Winnipeg
  • General first year, with second year entry into one of two majors: Community Development or Indigenous Social Entrepreneurship
  • Students are required to complete a total of 12 credit hours elective courses in order to fulfill the program requirement to complete the first-year program.

The SICD program is designed for those aspiring to effect change in urban, rural, local, or global settings. Graduates of this program will have the theoretical knowledge, practical skills, and workplace experience for employment in sectors focusing on socio-economic development and environmental issues. The applied nature of the program helps students build the capacity to work for Indigenous communities and organizations, government institutions, or social enterprises.

Description

SICD features a common first year of foundational studies with a certificate exit followed by a specializing second year in which participants take one of two groups of electives leading to a diploma in Indigenous Social Entrepreneurship or a diploma in Community Development.

The program focuses on the social, political, cultural, and economic factors that contribute to the urban, rural, local, and global development of Indigenous peoples. Participants gain a deeper understanding of community development and economic reconciliation as observed through Indigenous perspectives.

The program features collaborative courses and assignments using a team-based approach. The delivery model focuses on experiential and project-based learning principles with capstone projects uniting multiple dimensions of learning, and introducing potential employment.

Admission Requirements

Your Academic History
If your academic history includes any of the following, please visit My Education for important information: post-secondary studies at an institution other than Red River College Polytechnic; Modified (M), English as an Additional Language (E), or GED high school courses; or home schooling.

DOCUMENT SUBMISSION METHODS

Upload Through Your Future Student Account (preferred method)

  • Scan your document(s) and save the file. Ensure you keep your original documents as the College may request to see them at any time.
  • Go to www.rrc.ca/apply and log in.
  • Click on your application, then Supplemental Items & Documents.

If you do not have a Future Student Account or require assistance, please contact our Student Service Centre at 204-632-2327.

Mail or In-Person: Student Service Centre Click here for address and hours of service

E-mail: register@rrc.ca

Fax: 204-697-0584

Internationally Educated Applicants - visit www.rrc.ca/credentials for credential assessment information.

Submission of required documentation indicating proof of completion of admission requirements is due within 30 days of applying unless otherwise noted in the program's admission requirements.

However, if you apply within 6 weeks of the program start date, admission requirements are due within 5 days of applying.

Regular Admission Requirements

  1. Grade 12
    • Submit proof of graduation from or enrolment in Grade 12, including one credit in each of the following:
      • Grade 12 English
      • Grade 12 Math
    • If you provide proof of enrolment at time of application, your official final grades indicating successful completion must be submitted by July 15 for fall enrolment or by the deadline specified in your admission letter
    • If you are required to complete an English language assessment, do not submit your transcripts until requested to do so.  See English Language Requirements (ELRs) for more information.
      and
  2. English Language Requirements (ELRs)
    • Answer this question to determine if you meet this program’s ELRs:
      Have I successfully completed 3 years of full-time high school (secondary) education in Canada, the United States, or an ELR exempt country where English was the language of instruction?
      • If YES, you meet English language requirements.  Apply and then submit your transcripts* for review
        or
      • If NO, submit proof of meeting an ELRs option.  If you choose the English language assessment option, review this program's approved assessments and required levels.
        or 
      • If you completed all of your education in Canada, the United States, or an ELR exempt country in English but you did not graduate high school, submit your transcripts* for review. 
    • * If your transcripts are from the USA or an ELR exempt country, we will assess an International Credentials Assessment Fee to be paid before your transcripts will be reviewed.

Mature Student Admission Requirements
If you are 19 years of age or older and have been out of high school for a minimum of one year at time of application, and you do not meet the regular admission requirements, you may apply under the Mature Student admission requirements.

  1. Academic Requirement
    • High school graduation is not required, but you must have successfully completed or be enrolled in one credit in each of:
      • Grade 12 English
        and
      • Grade 12 Math
    • If you provide proof of enrolment at time of application, your official final grades indicating successful completion must be submitted by July 15 for fall enrolment or by the deadline specified in your admission letter
    • If you are required to complete an English language assessment, do not submit your transcripts until requested to do so.  See English Language Requirements (ELRs) for more information.
      and
  2. Meet Regular Admission Requirement 2

Program Progression Requirements
Program progression requirements are not due within 30 days of applying. These requirements have expiration dates and should be completed close to your program start date. Further information will be provided by the College at a later date.

A Criminal Record Check Vulnerable Sector Search (ACRVS) and/or a Child Abuse Registry (CAR) Check may be required by some practicum sites in the Community Development stream. You may not be able to attend some practicum sites if you have a criminal record or are listed on either the Child Abuse Registry or Adult Abuse Registry.

English Language Assessments

English Language AssessmentMinimum Required Levels
L - Listening, S - Speaking, R - Reading, W - WritingLSRW
AEPUCE (Academic English Program of University and College Entrance )
Requirement: Submission of a parchment (certificate) indicating successful completion of the AEPUCE program, including language levels achieved if available.
8888
CAEL and CAEL Online (Canadian Academic English Language)
60606060
CLB (LINC) (Canadian Language Benchmark - Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada)
Canadian Citizens: LINC programs are not available.
8888
CanTEST (Canadian Test of English for Scholars and Trainees)
As of October 20, 2021 the RRC CanTEST is no longer offered at RRC Polytechnic. RRC Institutional CanTEST results dated within 2 years of your application date will still be accepted to meet English language proficiency requirements. Please note the Medical Laboratory Sciences (MLS)program requires the Official CanTEST (The RRC Institutional CanTEST will not be accepted)
4.54.54.54.0
Duolingo (Duolingo English Test)

* MINIMUM OVERAL SCORE OF 115 REQUIRED.

There are no minimum required levels for L,S,R,W.

Due to closures related to COVID-19, RRC is temporarily allowing applicants to provide Duolingo English Test results to meet RRC's English language requirements.

Red River College will accept Duolingo assessments up to December 30, 2021. Beginning December 31, 2021 we will no longer accept Duolingo assessments to meet English language requirements.

0*0*0*0*
IELTS - Academic (International English Language Testing System)
6.56.56.56.5
LSI (Language Studies International)
6.56.56.56.5
PTE - Academic Online Assessment (Pearson Test of English)
58585858
TOEFL-iBT (Test of English as a Foreign Language - internet Based Test)
To meet the needs of students who are unable to take the TOEFL iBT® test at a test center due to public health concerns, ETS is temporarily offering the TOEFL iBT Special Home Edition test in selected areas.
20201924

Who Should Enrol?

The SICD program is designed for participants of all ages who aspire to effect change in urban, rural, local, or global settings. Graduates of this program will have the theoretical knowledge, practical skills, and workplace experience for employment in sectors focusing on socio-economic development and environmental issues. The applied nature of the program helps students build the capacity to work for Indigenous communities and organizations, government institutions, or social enterprises.

SICD features a common first year of foundational studies followed by a specializing second year in Indigenous Social Entrepreneurship or Community Development. If they choose, participants may take a certificate when they have completed the first year and return to complete the second year at a later time. Participants may as many courses as they choose, up to the regular full-time load.

The program focuses on the social, political, cultural, and economic factors that contribute to the urban, rural, local, and global development of Indigenous peoples. Participants gain a deeper understanding of community development and economic reconciliation as observed through Indigenous perspectives.

Locations, Dates and Fees

Next Estimated Term 1 Start Date (subject to change)

Location Start Date Apply Link
Fisher River Campus Jan 04, 2022 Apply Now

Costs (estimates only; subject to change)

Program/Student Fees
Year 1
$4,084.00
Books and Supplies
Year 1
$500.00
Other Fees
Year 1
$255.001
Program/Student Fees (International)
Year 1
$14,228.002
1Health & Dental
2Includes Health, Dental and International Health Fees

Winnipeg Locations

Next Estimated Term 1 Start Date (subject to change)

Location Start Date Apply Link
Innovation Centre Aug 29, 2022 Apply Now

Costs (estimates only; subject to change)

Program/Student Fees
Year 1
$4,877.00
Books and Supplies
Year 1
$500.00
Other Fees
Year 1
$255.003
Program/Student Fees (International)
Year 1
$16,729.004
3Health and Dental
4Includes Health, Dental and International Health Fees

Students may apply for financial assistance through the Manitoba Student Aid program. For general information on applying please call 204-945-6321 or 1-800-204-1685, or visit their website at www.manitobastudentaid.ca, which also includes an online application. For detailed information, please visit one of the RRC Polytech Student Service Centres or call 204-632-2327. Applicants requiring financial assistance should complete their student loan applications well in advance of the class start date.

Red River College Polytechnic is a participating institution in the HigherEdPoints program. Through this program, students are able to convert Aeroplan® Miles and TD Points into funds to help cover their tuition. Family members and friends can also contribute to a student’s education by converting their loyalty points - anyone can donate their points to an individual student.

Visit the HigherEdPoints website for more information about the program and/or to set up an account to convert your points.

Program Outline

SICD features a common first year of foundational studies (two terms of 15 weeks each) followed by a specializing second year (two terms of 15 weeks each) in which participants specialize in Indigenous Social Entrepreneurship or in Community Development. 

Part-time participants should meet with a Student Advisor to determine the best order in which they should take the courses. 

At this time, the entire program can be completed asynchronously; that is, all courses can be completed online and all classes are recorded to facilitate viewing (or viewing more than once) at times other than the original schedule.

Pre-Requisites

When the participants have been accepted into the program(s), they are free to choose the order in which they will take the courses. 

Courses and Descriptions

(Click the course name to view the description of the course)
Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)
In addition to Transfer of Credit from a recognized post secondary institution, other RPL processes are available for RPL courses. Click here for more information. For courses with no RPL, please check www.rrc.ca/rpl for additional contact information.
ACCT-1057Financial Accounting
More Information

The ability to understand financial statements to make sound strategic decisions is paramount to the success of any profit or not-for-profit organization, In this course, students will learn basic accounting principles and use them to prepare the financial tools used in community development and social entrepreneurship: budgets, cash flow projections, monthly financial statements, and annual reports. They will use the accounting software learned in the first term computer course.

ACCT-1071Accounting FundamentalsRPL
More Information

In this course, the student will be introduced to fundamental accounting principles, concepts and techniques. This course will focus on double-entry bookkeeping and the preparation of financial statements focusing on sole proprietorship. Period end processes, such as adjusting accounts and the closing process are also discussed. The result is a complete presentation of the accounting cycle for service and merchandise businesses. Throughout the course, interpreting financial statements from a non-accounting manager perspective will be included.


ACCT-2071Financial AccountingRPL
More Information

This course builds on the knowledge the student developed in the Accounting Fundamentals course. It begins with a detailed view of adjusting and closing entries followed by an examination of inventory costing methods and accounts receivable, short-term notes receivable, capital assets and current liabilities. Accounting for partnerships along with an introduction to corporation accounting covering the issuance of shares and dividends will also be examined in this course. Other topics covered include accounting for non-current liabilities and the statement of cash flows.

Prerequisites:
ADMN-1010Introduction to Canadian BusinessRPL
More Information

This course is designed to introduce the student to the complexities of the Canadian business environment. Exposure to business frameworks, accounting, finance, marketing, management, human resource management and operations management will be provided. Special emphasis is placed on small business; the driver of the economy and creator of most new jobs. The course will include case studies, applications, and analyses of Canadian businesses.

COMM-1173Communication Strategies
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Everyone communicates, but are they doing it well? Communicative competence takes practice and self-awareness. By developing their communication skills, the student will improve their interpersonal ability, intercultural competence, and digital fluency to prepare the student for success in the workplace. In Communication Strategies, the student will learn through discovery and project-based activities to practice approaching situations critically and collaboratively. The strategies the student will gain in this course will be useful throughout their program and in their chosen industry.

COMM-2055Client Relationships
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This course further develops the student's communication skills as they apply to the world of business. The student will learn to select appropriate modes of communication and practice with applying different types of strategies in managing client relationships and building networks. The significance of teamwork in business through participation in group work will be examined. The student will also practice and develop client interview skills applicable in all areas of business to support internal and external customer service, problem solving, needs assessment and sales. Technologies will be explored including the application of Customer Relationship Management (CRM). The student will also submit a series of documents used in business communication. 

Prerequisites:
COMM-2175Communication for Social Innovation
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Welcome to Communication for Social Innovation! In this course, students will continue to build their communication skills by exploring the specific communication techniques used in careers in social innovation and community development. They will continue to practice and apply the active listening, intercultural, and social awareness strategies necessary to facilitate communication and advocacy between communities and government. Students will use a variety of communication channels, both written and spoken, to practice communicating professionally, inclusively, collaboratively, and empathetically with diverse audiences.

Prerequisites:
COMP-1255Business ApplicationsRPL
More Information

This course is offered in a blended format featuring online content with in class workshops on current topics in computing. This is a hands-on course where the student will develop skills in the use of Windows, Word, and PowerPoint, advanced skills in Excel and exposure to relational databases. A final project integrates these applications.

COMP-1264Computer Applications for Social Innovation
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Students will be introduced to a wide range of current, relevant computer software applications which support community development and social innovation initiatives. They will explore appropriate tools for networking, collaborating, creating documents and presentations, and managing research and projects.. These skills will be immediately applied to activities in other courses, individually and in teams, and to their work after graduation. Students will also be coached in methods for assessing the usefulness of various computer software applications as technology evolves.

DEVE-1041Indigenous Knowledge and Leadership
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Students will explore traditional knowledge systems embedded in Indigenous community practices. They will be introduced to the different protocols and ceremonies followed in Indigenous communities and instructed in ways to participate or observe respectfully. Students will explore the relationships between Indigenous peoples and the natural environment and Indigenous worldviews. Pre-colonial and contemporary leadership structures, and nation-to-nation and international agreements will be reviewed. Global, federal, and local perspectives on Indigenous leadership, resistance, and reconciliation will be presented. This course lays a foundation of insight that supports learning in more advanced courses.

DEVE-1042Foundations of Social Innovation
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In this foundational course, students will be introduced to social ideas in action: how new ideas are created, developed, and applied in line with the values, principles, concepts, and strategies currently used to mobilize change and address social inequality through community-based initiatives. They will be introduced to a range of social enterprises and community development agencies in Canada and around the world, and explore opportunities that social enterprises and community development agencies have created to address social needs. This course provides students with the information needed to make a choice between specializing in community development or social entrepreneurship.

DEVE-1043Social Innovation Capstone
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In small teams, using current project management tools and procedures, students will be matched with a community organization to undertake a project addressing the client’s challenge. The team will create an opportunity for expansion, scale, or greater effectiveness or innovation. They will be supervised by the instructor in partnership with the community supervisor. There will be opportunities for connections with other courses, such as Applied Economics and Reconciling Our Economic Futures. Each student is graded on participation, productivity, and professionalism. The project will provide the students with work-integrated experience and an opportunity to work closely with a potential employer.

ECON-1009Applied Economics
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While governments, non-profits, businesses, and social enterprises distribute resources in a variety of ways, they are built on values that are all interconnected in order for communities and economies to thrive. This course will explore the 45+ continuum of values, principles and theories that support or hinder participation within microeconomics and macroeconomics as applied to the Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities where people work and live.

ECON-1041Reconciling Our Economic Futures
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Reconciliation represents many things to many people. As we continue on a path to truth and reconciliation in Canada, this generation will define what reconciliation means to them. Students will be introduced to different perspectives on, and examples of economic reconciliation. They will be guided in the process of exploring and establishing their own understanding of reconciliation which will inform their professional development and understanding of second-year courses. This course incorporates examples of reconciliation from across Canada and includes a wide range of speakers who represent different parts of the country.

FNCE-1010Financial Literacy
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A basic understanding of money – how it is made, managed, and invested – is fundamental to our day-to-day lives. Financial literacy should be learned and reinforced throughout life as our needs change. This course will increase students’ financial knowledge and skills by teaching them how to manage their income, track their expenses, and set and achieve their financial goals. Students will learn how to track expenses and manage personal debt. They will also be introduced to different banking products and budget creation techniques that will help them hone the skills, knowledge, and confidence required to make responsible financial decisions.

HUMR-1064Human Resource Management
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This course introduces the student to the comprehensive responsibilities of Human Resource Management in today’s evolving and diverse business environment. The student will learn how Human Resource Managers apply best practices, provide value, manage the global marketplace, and oversee talent in the workplace. Specific emphasis will be placed on the topics of recruitment, job analysis, legal compliance, human capital, training, performance management, and building and maintaining stakeholder relationships.

LANG-1050Anishinaabemowin Culture and Language 1
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This course will focus on the knowledge and application of the basic grammatical structure of the Anishinaabemowin double vowel writing system utilizing Anishinaabe cultural perspectives and knowledge as the context and content. The students will be able to speak, read and write the Anishinaabemowin language at an introductory level.

LANG-1051Anishinaabemowin Culture and Language 2
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This course will continue to focus on language proficiency utilizing Anishinaabe cultural worldview and teachings as the context and content. The students will expand on their ability to speak, read and write the Anishinaabemowin language at an introductory to intermediate level using the Double Vowel writing system.

MATH-1078Business Mathematics
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This foundational course demonstrates the importance of mathematics in today’s business environment. Through a modular design, the student will explore the terminology, characteristics, and calculations of business measures as they relate to general business skills, accounting, human resource management, logistics, marketing, and financial services

MGMT-1093Conflict Resolution
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This course will examine a range of perspectives, practices, and strategies for resolving conflict. Through readings and hands-on activities, the student will explore the history and causes of conflict and discover how individuals act and react in different conflict situations. The student will apply the materials in this course to their own experiences, contexts, and settings, and develop an integrative perspective in which the implication of different theories and research for conflict resolution practice is understood. The student will also apply strategies for resolving conflict and develop skills for positive, performance evaluation. By exploring Indigenous approaches to conflict resolution, the student will learn to appreciate the importance of culture in conflict resolution. The student will also review a number of tools for conducting self-assessments and identifying their personality profile to develop greater self-awareness and Emotional Intelligence.

MRKT-1017Marketing Foundations
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This course focuses on the high level role that marketing plays in strategic planning and organizational management. This course takes a student-centred approach to the current customer-focused marketing landscape in today’s digital and global world. The student will gain an in depth understanding of the marketing mix and the impact these elements have on the marketing process. The student will apply the broad framework of market segmentation using the concepts of segmentation, targeting and positioning (STP). The student will segment a market by organizing the market into groups, use targeting to send a message to potential segments, and use positioning to identify how customers view a product or service.

PROJ-1011Basic Project Management
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This course provides the fundamental aspects and principles of project planning including initiating, planning, executing and controlling a project from start to finish, on budget and on time. Project Managers are required by every business and community organization to manage multiple projects for employers and clients. These skills also apply to student balancing responsibilities and assignments at home, work and school. This course will focus on developing a strong foundation in Project Management.

CO-OP/Practicum Information

Participants learn through practice to work well in collaboration with a variety of groups, using project-based learning principles with capstone projects uniting multiple dimensions of learning, and introducing potential employment. Participants complete work experience courses at all levels of the program.

Computer/Laptop Requirements

Online learning is a critical component of course delivery in all Red River College programs. To ensure each student has the tools they need to achieve their academic goals, all Red River College students require, at minimum:

1.  Off-campus access to a current computer with a webcam

2.  A high speed internet connection

• Recommended minimum speed: 10 mbps for download, 3 mbps for upload
• Slower internet connection speeds may result in audio and video issues. Please keep in mind that if others in your home are using the same internet connection at the same time as you are, you may also experience audio and video issues.
• Please refer to https://www.rrc.ca/future-students/computer-requirements/ for further information on Computer Requirements for Students.

Please note that any anticipated costs are not included in Books and Supplies estimates.

Objectives/Learning Outcomes

Social Innovation and Community Development Year 1 Certificate

1. Advises on and facilitates responses to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Action.
2. Utilizes business administrative skills to support, build, monitor, and report on economic development opportunities and initiatives.
3. Applies knowledge of governance structures and Indigenous knowledge, protocols, and history to work within Indigenous communities.
4. Performs administrative tasks on small or large development projects that require interfacing with different Indigenous bodies and Canadian governments.
5. Demonstrates professionalism by respecting diversity, making ethical decisions, and implementing strategies to complete tasks, meet deadlines, and work within teams.
6. Understands and utilizes holistic approaches to personal and community wellness.
7. Applies communication techniques to mobilize and empower communities through facilitation, education, capacity building, and advocacy
8. Utilizes technologies to create and communicate information, and to identify opportunities for social innovation.
9. Demonstrates creativity, critical thinking, problem solving, and responsible citizenship.
10. Builds community connections through civic engagement and cultural exposure.

Indigenous Social Entrepreneurship SE Year 2 Diploma 

1. Creates business solutions to social problems by applying theory, models, and tools, along with innovative and critical thinking to enhance opportunities for Indigenous communities.
2. Analyzes the social and economic environment to identify gaps, barriers, and opportunities for Indigenous communities.
3. Markets a service or product by conducting a market analysis to meet market demands within a competitive social enterprise environment.
4. Understands unresolved historical tensions that must be understood to build healthy working relationships with Indigenous communities.
5. Recognizes and interprets different governance structures, regulations, and Indigenous traditional knowledge systems to develop business models and philosophies within the Social Enterprise sector.
6. Evaluates the desirability, feasibility, and viability of a product or service by applying quality assurance methodologies.
7. Applies a core set of entrepreneurial skills to develop, launch, and maintain a Social Enterprise.
8. Develops and implements communication, time management, and organizational strategies to complete tasks, meet deadlines, and demonstrate teamwork skills.
9. Incorporates Indigenous worldviews to articulate economic and organizational goals - including mission, vision, and values.
10. Demonstrates professionalism by respecting diversity, making ethical decisions, and working to create business solutions that address social problems.

Community Development Year 2 Diploma 

1. Practices universal Community Development principles to build sustainable healthy and equitable communities.
2. Fosters trust relationships and builds social capital to create viable teams and networks to sustain the community development process.
3. Work with communities to build and maintain social capital that supports socially-inclusive community ownership and teamwork.
4. Communicates across different cultures and sectors using visual, written, and oral methods that support cooperation and understanding among community stakeholders.
5. Uses and adapts technologies to create and communicate information, as well as to manage project deadlines, resources, and deliverables
6. Plans, documents, and evaluates organizational and community initiatives using a variety of participatory methods.
7. Supports community planning by designing, implementing, and reporting on research conducted to map assets, assess needs, and monitor trends and new practices in community development
8. Engages with community to identify, maintain, and assess community resources.
9. Identifies funding sources to generate revenue for community development initiatives.
10. Writes grant proposals to secure funds for various community initiatives.
11. Manages and administers organizational resources to provide stability and sustainability.
12. Demonstrates personal integrity, reliability, ethics, accountability, and resourcefulness

Recent Changes

Social Innovation and Community Development is being moved to course-based registration to facilitate participants who want to study online, at a distance, part-time, and while working or while fulfilling other responsibilities in their lives. The instructors and the delivery are flexible.

The first year will begin course-based registration in the fall of 2021. The second year will begin course-based registration in the fall of 2022. Current participants who have completed the first year  through program-based registration will complete the second year through program-based registration, but they will be welcome to return in the future to take the rest of the program through course-based registration.

Transfer Credit Opportunities

Depending upon the second-year specialization chosen, the participant may complete the program with several credits transferable to other programs. Many participants will choose to complete BOTH the community development and the social enterprise certificates, in which case they will be able to take advantage of more transferable credits between the programs.

Recognition of Prior Learning

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is a process which documents and compares an individual's prior learning gained from prior education, work and life experiences and personal study to the learning outcomes in College courses/programs. For more information, please visit www.rrc.ca/rpl.

Graduate Employment Report

Red River College Polytechnic surveys its graduates on an annual basis to collect data related to the graduates’ employment status, salary, occupation and skill use. In addition, graduates are asked to indicate their level of satisfaction regarding the education they received at Red River College Polytechnic.

Visit www.rrc.ca/numbers/reports/graduate-satisfaction for graduate satisfaction and employment reports.

Graduation Requirements

Participants are eligible to graduate when they have completed all the courses in the program with a grade of at least 50 percent.

Employment Potential

Graduates of the community development and social enterprise programs have gained employment in a wide range of community organizations. They have the theoretical knowledge, practical skills, and workplace experience for employment in sectors focusing on socio-economic development and environmental issues. The applied nature of the program helps students build the capacity to work for Indigenous communities and organizations, government institutions, or social enterprises. Many graduates have continued to work for the organizations where they completed work experiences. Some have joined social enterprises and some have started social enterprises of their own.

Contact Information

For general information about this or any other program, admission requirements, or how to apply, contact Indigenous Liaison Advisor at indigenous@rrc.ca or visit https://www.rrc.ca/indigenous/aspiring-student/

For detailed program information, contact:
Monica Morin
Acting Access Pathways Manager
F210–2055 Notre Dame Ave


Centre for International Education
and Global Partnerships

D210-2055 Notre Dame Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3H 0J9
Phone: 1.204.632.2143
Email: intled@rrc.ca or call your
Red River College Recruiter

College Support Services

Red River College Polytechnic is committed to student success and provides valuable support services to assist in helping students make the most of their time at RRC Polytech.

Visit www.rrc.ca/supports for more information.

Academic Advising Service
Our academic advising service can provide information about our full-time programs, explain program admission requirements, and help you select the right program to meet your career and academic goals. We can also connect you with helpful people, resources, and supports.
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Red River College Polytechnic endeavours to provide the most current version of all program and course information on this website. Please be advised that classes may be scheduled between 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. The College reserves the right to modify or cancel any course, program, process, or procedure without notice or prejudice. Fees may change without notice.