AMESF-DP American Sign Language-English Interpretation

Courses and Descriptions

Courses and Descriptions

(Click the course name to view the description of the course)
Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)
In addition to Transfer of Credit from a recognized post secondary institution, other RPL processes are available for RPL courses. Click here for more information. For courses with no RPL, please check www.rrc.ca/rpl for additional contact information.
AEIR-1001Language Processing - English
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This is the first course of a three-course language processing series that develops pre-interpretation skills. This first course focuses on English and is designed to develop competencies that are necessary for both consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. Through classroom lectures and lab work, students will develop competencies in text analysis. Modules are as follows: Understanding Meaning, Abstracting, Paraphrasing, Phonemic Shadowing, Clozing, and Phrase Shadowing.

AEIR-1002Cross-Language Processing
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This is the third course of the three-course language processing series that develops pre-interpretation skills. This third course incorporates both English and ASL in that each exercise necessitates the transfer of a source message in one language to a target message in the other language. Exercises are designed to develop competencies that are necessary for both consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. Through classroom lectures conducted in either English or ASL and lab work, students will develop the ability to work between the two languages with competencies in Abstracting, Clozing, Register Shifting, and Translating.

AEIR-1003Language Processing - ASL
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This is the second course of a three-course language processing series that develops pre-interpretation skills. This second course focuses on ASL and is designed to develop competencies that are necessary for both consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. Through classroom lectures conducted in ASL and lab work, students will develop competencies in text analysis. Modules are as follows: Phonemic Shadowing, Understanding Meaning, Phrase Shadowing, Abstracting, Paraphrasing, and Clozing.

AEIR-1005English Comprehension and Expression
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This is a practical course in English that develops the students' ability to efficiently think about, organize and express concepts. Throughout the course, students will participate in a variety of individual and group activities that provide practice in processing and conceptualizing information. The English source language materials provided will increase in length and complexity as the course progresses in order to best prepare students for the eventual task of consecutive and simultaneous ASL-English interpretation in a variety of settings. In addition, students will have many opportunities to practice interpreting for one another, learn about how to prepare to interpret, provide peer feedback and reflect on their interpretations. Practice interpretation is an experiential learning component; therefore, interpretations will not be assessed for this course.

AEIR-2001ASL 4
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This course is designed to further enhance the study of ASL. It provides students with an in-depth exploration of ASL lexicon/grammar and ways of making transitions between ideas through exposure to a variety of ASL language models and styles. Students explore the meaning of content as it is revealed in context. Skills that will continue to be developed are: complex uses of space, use of classifiers, use of body and gaze shift, use of affect, transition markers, and determining appropriate perspective in specific texts. Exercises lead to a decreased dependency on English syntactic structure.

AEIR-2002Interpretation Settings 1
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This course is an overview of a variety of settings where interpreters may find themselves working. The class format will include lectures and guest speakers who have expertise in interpreting in the following areas: education, employment, health, legal, meetings, performing arts, recreational, social, and spiritual settings.

AEIR-2003Ethics 1
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This is the first of two courses in ethics for ASL-English interpretation students. The course introduces students to the theories of moral development and branches of ethical study such as applied ethics, descriptive ethics, and meta-ethics. The notion of personal and cultural identity and bias will be explored at length. Students will engage in discussion and activities that address issues in individual, social, and professional ethics and how they apply to the interpreter working between two cultural and linguistic groups. Students will also examine the Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada's Code of Ethics and Guidelines for Professional Conduct from a historical perspective and compare it with current thought and ethical practice.

AEIR-2004Interpretation Settings 2
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Interpretation Settings 2 provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate professional and ethical conduct during practical and seminar experiences. Students will have the opportunity to go into the field to accompany trained interpreter-practitioners who are AVLIC-MAVLI members to a number of interpreting assignments in a variety of settings. For each setting experience students can expect to establish goals, and prepare, observe, and interpret part of the assignment when appropriate. Following each assignment students will meet with the interpreter-practitioner(s) to discuss relevant issues. As part of the learning experience, students are also required to actively participate in the weekly seminar.

AEIR-2005Ethics 2
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This is the second of two courses in ethics for ASL-English interpretation students. The course builds on the first with an emphasis on application and exploration of case studies and discussions of ethical issues and/or dilemmas as they arise in student experiences in the AEIP. Additional themes of audism, majority and minority group relations, interpreter self-care, and becoming an ally will be discussed in the context of the interpreter working between two cultural and linguistic groups. Students will develop skills that will enable them as future professional interpreters to identify ethical dilemmas, predict outcomes of various courses of action, and propose resolutions that are in harmony with the Association of Visual Language Interpreters of Canada's Code of Ethics and Guidelines for Professional Conduct.

AEIR-2006Interpretation Lab 1
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Students are given guided practice in the tasks of consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. Students work on prepared texts, developing expertise in ASL to English, English to ASL and interactive discourse. Team interpretation and feedback skills are addressed.

AEIR-2006Interpretation Lab 1
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Students are given guided practice in the tasks of consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. Students work on prepared texts, developing expertise in ASL to English, English to ASL and interactive discourse. Team interpretation and feedback skills are addressed.

AEIR-2007ASL 5
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This advanced ASL course is designed to further enhance language skills pertaining to particular subject areas commonly found in interpretation settings. Besides developing ASL vocabulary associated with these areas, students will work on expressive and receptive language skills related to language genre and register such as a medical interview, counselling session, lectures in post-secondary education, technical language used in employment, conference interpreting, and some legal settings.

Prerequisites:
AEIR-3001Interpretation Lab 2
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Students will participate in a variety of live interpretation situations that serve to develop their skills in both consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. Interpreting opportunities will take place both on-campus and in a number of off-campus locations. All interpretations executed by students will be monitored by the course instructors or by qualified interpreter practitioners. In addition to the practical component of this course, students will develop the ability to analyze and assess their own interpretation skills, and to establish and monitor a personal skill development plan.

AEIR-3002Practicum Seminar
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Practicum Seminar provides an opportunity for students to discuss, further analyze, and synthesize their Practicum experiences with their peers and AEIP faculty.  Practicum Seminar topics are the students' key learnings as found in the previous Practica experiences.

AEIR-3003Practicum
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Students are placed with a Practicum Host and participate in the daily interpreting activities and job expectations of the host site as determined by the host site's Practicum Coordinator, AEIP Faculty, and the practicum students.

AEIR-3004Problems in ASL& English Interpretation
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Students look at examples of common errors and miscues that occur in ASL-English interpretations and apply models of interpreting and a variety of methods of analysis. The main focus will be on the examination of students' own interpreted work from Lab 2 (or other sources of practice interpretation) as they develop skills to speculate possible causes for miscues, come up with strategies to improve, and learn to provide supportive and critical feedback to peers. During this process, students will also have the opportunity to re-do and improve upon some of their previous interpreted work.

Prerequisites:
AEIU-1001English Elective (U of M ENGL.XXXX)
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An introduction to the study of literature with emphasis on the development of reading and writing skills, poetry, prose and drama from various historical periods. Texts for each section will be announced. Students may not hold credit for both 004.120 and 004.124. English 40S or the former English 300 are strongly recommended, but English 40G or the former 301 or 30S will also be accepted.

AEIU-1002Intro to Interpreting (UofM LING 2740)
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A survey of interpretation theory including specifics of language use and problems in the transfer of cultural content for both source and target language, the history of language awareness on the part of the interpreter, and the development of theories of interpretation. This course will draw heavily on the field of ASL-English Interpretation for Illustration. Prerequisites: a grade of 'C' or better in LING 1200 (126.120) Introduction to Linguistics or written consent of instructor.

Prerequisites:
AEIU-1003Syntax (U of M LING 2200)
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Sentences are complex arrangements of words and other elements, and syntactic structures have long been at the centre of theoretical controversy. A typological survey of syntactic patterns, introducing formal and functional approaches to syntactic analysis, will be covered. Prerequisite: a grade of 'C' or better in LING 1200 (126.120) or written consent of instructor.

AEIU-1003Syntax (U of M LING 2200)
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Sentences are complex arrangements of words and other elements, and syntactic structures have long been at the centre of theoretical controversy. A typological survey of syntactic patterns, introducing formal and functional approaches to syntactic analysis, will be covered. Prerequisite: a grade of 'C' or better in LING 1200 (126.120) or written consent of instructor.

AEIU-1004Linguistics Elective (U of M LING.XXXX)
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Students must consult the University of Manitoba Calendar and pursue a 3-credit course that suits their interest and availability.

AEIU-1005Morphology (U of M LING 2460)
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This course covers the internal structure of words: the traditional distinction between inflection and derivation, types of word structures, word-formation rules, and levels of word-formation. The relationship of morphology to phonology and syntax is explored. Prerequisite: a grade of 'C' or better in LING 1200 (126.120) or written consent of instructor.

AEIU-1006Science Elective (U of M)
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Students must consult the University of Manitoba Calendar and pursue a 3-credit course that suits their interest and availability. Note: Students could opt to pursue a 3-credit course that satisfies 3 credits of science as well as the 3-credit mathematics requirement (see AEIU-1007). Students are encouraged to meet with an advisor to identify courses that satisfy this criteria.

AEIU-1007Mathematics Elective (U of M)
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Students must consult the University of Manitoba Calendar and pursue a 3-credit course that suits their interest and availability. Note: students could opt to pursue a 3-credit course that satisfies 3 credits of mathematics as well as 3 credits of science (see AEIU-1006). Students are encouraged to meet with an advisor to identify courses that satisfy this criteria.

AEIU-2001Structure of ASL (U of M LING 3300)
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An examination of ASL as a signed language as opposed to spoken language. Topics include phonetic, phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures. Pre-requisites: a grade of C+ or better in each of 126.1200 Introduction to Linguistics, 126.220 Syntax, and 126.2460 Morphology or written consent of the instructor.

AEIU-2001Structure of ASL (U of M LING 3300)
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An examination of ASL as a signed language as opposed to spoken language. Topics include phonetic, phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures. Pre-requisites: a grade of C+ or better in each of 126.1200 Introduction to Linguistics, 126.220 Syntax, and 126.2460 Morphology or written consent of the instructor.

AEIU-3001General Elective Option A (U of M)
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Students must consult the University of Manitoba Calendar and pursue a 6-credit course that suits their interest and availability. Students could opt to take two 3 - credit courses in lieu of one 6-credit course. See AEIU-3002 General Elective Option B1 and AEIU-3003 General Elective Option B2.

AEIU-3002General Elective Option B1 (U of M)
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Students must consult the University of Manitoba Calendar and pursue a 3-credit course that suits their interest and availability. Note: this course will satisfy only one of two required 3-credit general electives. See also AEIU-3003 General Elective Option B2.

AEIU-3003General Elective Option B2 (U of M)
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Students must consult the University of Manitoba Calendar and pursue a 3-credit course that suits their interest and availability. Note: this course will satisfy only one of two required 3-credit general electives. See also AEIU-3002 General Elective Option B1.

AEIU-3004Topics in American Sign Language (U of M LING 3840)
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Topics of current interest in American Sign Language are examined. Prerequisite: written permission of instructor.

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